The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

How Symbiosis Can Guide Evolution

How Symbiosis Can Guide Evolution
How Symbiosis Can Guide Evolution
Hinton and Nowlan have demonstrated a model of how lifetime plasticity can guide evolution. They show how acquired traits change the shape of the reward landscape in which subsequent genetic variation takes place, and in so doing encourage the discovery of equivalent heritable traits. This enables the seemingly Lamarkian inheritance of acquired characteristics without the direct transfer of information from the phenotype to the genotype. This paper draws direct inspiration from their work to illustrate a different phenomenon. We demonstrate how the formation of symbiotic relationships in an ecosystem can guide the course of subsequent genetic variation. This phenomenon can be described as two phases: First, symbiotic groups find solutions where individual organisms cannot, simply because lifetime interaction produces new combinations of abilities more rapidly than the relatively slow genetic variation of individuals. Second, these symbiotic groups subsequently change the shape of the reward landscape for evolution, providing a gradient that guides genetic variation to the same solution. Ultimately, an individual organism exhibits the capabilities formerly exhibited by the group. This process enables the combination of characteristics from organisms of distinct species without direct transfer of genetic information.
29-38
Springer-Verlag
Watson, Richard A.
ce199dfc-d5d4-4edf-bd7b-f9e224c96c75
Pollack, Jordan B.
9ec3d634-1257-4bdc-b7d7-7d1aad22faf4
Floreano, Dario
Nicoud, Jean-Daniel
Mondada, Francesco
Watson, Richard A.
ce199dfc-d5d4-4edf-bd7b-f9e224c96c75
Pollack, Jordan B.
9ec3d634-1257-4bdc-b7d7-7d1aad22faf4
Floreano, Dario
Nicoud, Jean-Daniel
Mondada, Francesco

Watson, Richard A. and Pollack, Jordan B. (1999) How Symbiosis Can Guide Evolution. Floreano, Dario, Nicoud, Jean-Daniel and Mondada, Francesco (eds.) In Advances in Artificial Life: 5th European Conference, ECAL'99, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 13-17, 1999 Proceedings. vol. 1674, Springer-Verlag. pp. 29-38.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Hinton and Nowlan have demonstrated a model of how lifetime plasticity can guide evolution. They show how acquired traits change the shape of the reward landscape in which subsequent genetic variation takes place, and in so doing encourage the discovery of equivalent heritable traits. This enables the seemingly Lamarkian inheritance of acquired characteristics without the direct transfer of information from the phenotype to the genotype. This paper draws direct inspiration from their work to illustrate a different phenomenon. We demonstrate how the formation of symbiotic relationships in an ecosystem can guide the course of subsequent genetic variation. This phenomenon can be described as two phases: First, symbiotic groups find solutions where individual organisms cannot, simply because lifetime interaction produces new combinations of abilities more rapidly than the relatively slow genetic variation of individuals. Second, these symbiotic groups subsequently change the shape of the reward landscape for evolution, providing a gradient that guides genetic variation to the same solution. Ultimately, an individual organism exhibits the capabilities formerly exhibited by the group. This process enables the combination of characteristics from organisms of distinct species without direct transfer of genetic information.

Text watson_hsge_ecal_1999.pdf - Other
Download (74kB)

More information

Published date: 1999
Additional Information: Lecture Notes In Computer Science; Vol. 1674
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 262009
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/262009
PURE UUID: 81b6db44-2b35-448c-985d-d26ee39907cc

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Feb 2006
Last modified: 05 Oct 2018 11:35

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×