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Sex ratios and the risks of haematological malignancies

Sex ratios and the risks of haematological malignancies
Sex ratios and the risks of haematological malignancies
Although the sex of an individual confers one of the greatest of the known risks for contracting leukaemia and lymphomas, very little attention is paid to these risks. It is the purpose of this paper to stimulate further research in this area. The sex rate ratios are presented for the commoner haematological malignancies. The male excess in the lymphoid cancers is most marked in the youngest age group in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, while acute lymphoblastic leukaemia shows equal sex ratios in the childhood peak. Both chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphocytic lymphoma display an unusual pattern, hitherto undescribed, with a large male excess specific to the 40s and 60s age groups. The myeloid sex ratios are all characterized by slight female excess in early adulthood followed by marked male excess. The reasons for these patterns are discussed.
0007-1048
1071-1077
Cartwright, Ray A.
a94ebc1a-0f50-4db7-80fb-ae89b86f6062
Gurney, Karen A.
8bc602a2-bcfc-4fcb-a9ca-45961c68c56a
Moorman, Anthony V.
e4ced178-ee03-47ef-bc5e-25d8453951d5
Cartwright, Ray A.
a94ebc1a-0f50-4db7-80fb-ae89b86f6062
Gurney, Karen A.
8bc602a2-bcfc-4fcb-a9ca-45961c68c56a
Moorman, Anthony V.
e4ced178-ee03-47ef-bc5e-25d8453951d5

Cartwright, Ray A., Gurney, Karen A. and Moorman, Anthony V. (2002) Sex ratios and the risks of haematological malignancies. British Journal of Haematology, 118 (4), 1071-1077. (doi:10.1046/j.1365-2141.2002.03750.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although the sex of an individual confers one of the greatest of the known risks for contracting leukaemia and lymphomas, very little attention is paid to these risks. It is the purpose of this paper to stimulate further research in this area. The sex rate ratios are presented for the commoner haematological malignancies. The male excess in the lymphoid cancers is most marked in the youngest age group in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, while acute lymphoblastic leukaemia shows equal sex ratios in the childhood peak. Both chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphocytic lymphoma display an unusual pattern, hitherto undescribed, with a large male excess specific to the 40s and 60s age groups. The myeloid sex ratios are all characterized by slight female excess in early adulthood followed by marked male excess. The reasons for these patterns are discussed.

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Published date: 2002

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 26237
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/26237
ISSN: 0007-1048
PURE UUID: 6e1d9232-50c6-4f2a-ba3e-7c8618414670

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Date deposited: 21 Apr 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:14

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