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Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine

Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine
Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine
Antigenic cross-reactivity between certain tumours has allowed the development of more widely applicable, major histocompatibility complex-disparate (allogeneic) whole-cell vaccines. This principle should also allow heat shock proteins (hsp) derived from certain tumours (and carrying cross-reactive antigens) to be used as vaccines to generate anti-tumour immunity in a range of cancer patients. Here, hsp70 derived from gp70-antigen+ B16 melanoma generated cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated immune protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with gp70-antigen+ CT26 colorectal tumour cells. Using ovalbumin as a model tumour antigen, it is shown that hsp70 enhances peptide re-presentation by dendritic cells via class I over equimolar whole ovalbumin antigen. However, while transfection of tumour cells with inducible hsp70 increases hsp yield from tumours, it does not enhance antigen recognition via purified hsp70 nor via whole cells or their lysate.
0019-2805
105-111
Casey, David G.
92ec5700-7ed2-4438-b3e3-d60d3674cfc4
Lysaght, Joanne
7139b956-7156-4f74-b097-57c505f71c5f
James, Tharappel
2f430f6c-1430-44e3-a03d-af7eb5eee0fb
Bateman, Andrew
a851558d-8b9b-4020-b148-a239c2b26815
Melcher, Alan A.
00d1a334-30ea-49e9-b47b-f1792325a835
Todryk, Stephen M.
3b7d8dd4-db91-47e0-8218-65a9fe220838
Casey, David G.
92ec5700-7ed2-4438-b3e3-d60d3674cfc4
Lysaght, Joanne
7139b956-7156-4f74-b097-57c505f71c5f
James, Tharappel
2f430f6c-1430-44e3-a03d-af7eb5eee0fb
Bateman, Andrew
a851558d-8b9b-4020-b148-a239c2b26815
Melcher, Alan A.
00d1a334-30ea-49e9-b47b-f1792325a835
Todryk, Stephen M.
3b7d8dd4-db91-47e0-8218-65a9fe220838

Casey, David G., Lysaght, Joanne, James, Tharappel, Bateman, Andrew, Melcher, Alan A. and Todryk, Stephen M. (2003) Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine. Immunology, 110 (1), 105-111. (doi:10.1046/j.1365-2567.2003.01726.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Antigenic cross-reactivity between certain tumours has allowed the development of more widely applicable, major histocompatibility complex-disparate (allogeneic) whole-cell vaccines. This principle should also allow heat shock proteins (hsp) derived from certain tumours (and carrying cross-reactive antigens) to be used as vaccines to generate anti-tumour immunity in a range of cancer patients. Here, hsp70 derived from gp70-antigen+ B16 melanoma generated cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated immune protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with gp70-antigen+ CT26 colorectal tumour cells. Using ovalbumin as a model tumour antigen, it is shown that hsp70 enhances peptide re-presentation by dendritic cells via class I over equimolar whole ovalbumin antigen. However, while transfection of tumour cells with inducible hsp70 increases hsp yield from tumours, it does not enhance antigen recognition via purified hsp70 nor via whole cells or their lysate.

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Published date: September 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 26238
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/26238
ISSN: 0019-2805
PURE UUID: 09b85781-8910-4dd0-b62a-c3af2b850788

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Date deposited: 21 Apr 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:14

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Contributors

Author: David G. Casey
Author: Joanne Lysaght
Author: Tharappel James
Author: Andrew Bateman
Author: Alan A. Melcher
Author: Stephen M. Todryk

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