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Automation of finite element aided design of induction motors using multi-slice 2D models

Automation of finite element aided design of induction motors using multi-slice 2D models
Automation of finite element aided design of induction motors using multi-slice 2D models
Purpose – To develop a practical design tool employing a general purpose electromagnetic finite element (FE) software package to perform automated simulation and performance analysis of induction motors in a design and optimisation process. Design/methodology/approach – Recent publications identified a suitable approach in applying 2D finite-element analysis to 3D problems. This, together with other similar work carried out on brushless DC motors, set out a framework for program development. Performance of the program was validated against practical test data. Findings – Finite-element analysis-based design tools can be realistically employed within a design office environment and are capable of providing solutions within acceptable time scales. Such tools no longer require user expertise in the underlying FE modelling method. The multiple slice technique was employed to model skew in three-phase induction motors and it was established that a four-slice model provides a good balance between accuracy and speed of computation. Research limitations/implications – Program development was based on one commercial FE software package and comparison with practical test data was not exhaustive. However, the approach outlined confirms the practical application. Future work could consider alternative approaches to optimisation. Practical implications – Computing hardware and commercially available 2D FE software have developed sufficiently to enable multi-slice techniques and optimisation to be employed in the analysis and design of machines. Originality/value – This paper provides a practical illustration of how commercial electromagnetic software can be employed as a design tool, demonstrating to industry that such tools no longer need to be bespoke and can realistically be used within a design office.
Computer aided design, Electric machines, Finite element analysis, Induction, Optimization techniques, Skewness
0332-1649
309-319
Griffiths, D.R.
84195d74-f724-417b-914d-c89252d1bb40
Sykulski, J.K.
d6885caf-aaed-4d12-9ef3-46c4c3bbd7fb
Griffiths, D.R.
84195d74-f724-417b-914d-c89252d1bb40
Sykulski, J.K.
d6885caf-aaed-4d12-9ef3-46c4c3bbd7fb

Griffiths, D.R. and Sykulski, J.K. (2006) Automation of finite element aided design of induction motors using multi-slice 2D models. COMPEL: The International Journal for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering, 25 (2), 309-319.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose – To develop a practical design tool employing a general purpose electromagnetic finite element (FE) software package to perform automated simulation and performance analysis of induction motors in a design and optimisation process. Design/methodology/approach – Recent publications identified a suitable approach in applying 2D finite-element analysis to 3D problems. This, together with other similar work carried out on brushless DC motors, set out a framework for program development. Performance of the program was validated against practical test data. Findings – Finite-element analysis-based design tools can be realistically employed within a design office environment and are capable of providing solutions within acceptable time scales. Such tools no longer require user expertise in the underlying FE modelling method. The multiple slice technique was employed to model skew in three-phase induction motors and it was established that a four-slice model provides a good balance between accuracy and speed of computation. Research limitations/implications – Program development was based on one commercial FE software package and comparison with practical test data was not exhaustive. However, the approach outlined confirms the practical application. Future work could consider alternative approaches to optimisation. Practical implications – Computing hardware and commercially available 2D FE software have developed sufficiently to enable multi-slice techniques and optimisation to be employed in the analysis and design of machines. Originality/value – This paper provides a practical illustration of how commercial electromagnetic software can be employed as a design tool, demonstrating to industry that such tools no longer need to be bespoke and can realistically be used within a design office.

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: Computer aided design, Electric machines, Finite element analysis, Induction, Optimization techniques, Skewness
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 262409
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/262409
ISSN: 0332-1649
PURE UUID: ff774c35-9d68-40c8-803d-c39ce177645f
ORCID for J.K. Sykulski: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6392-126X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Apr 2006
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:26

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