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Cure Gold Fever With Green Deposits

Cure Gold Fever With Green Deposits
Cure Gold Fever With Green Deposits
This is a reply to Matt Hodgkinson's posting in his journalology blog: (1) The Immediate-Deposit/Optional-Access (ID/OA) Mandate is a compromise deliberately designed to end deadlocks delaying the adoption of self-archiving mandates, by making publisher copyright policies or embargoes moot. It is not a substitute for OA but an accelerator toward OA. (2) There is no discovery problem with articles that have been deposited in OAI-compliant Institutional Repositories (IRs) . The discovery problem is with the articles that have not been deposited. (3) I don't criticise those who say Gold OA will lower publication costs. (I think it will too, eventually.) I criticise those who keep perseverating with Gold OA and costs while usage and impact continue to be lost and Green OA mandates (or ID/OA) can already put an immediate end to that loss, once and for all, right now. (4) CERN could have done a far greater service for other disciplines and for the growth of OA if it had put its weight and energy behind promoting its own own Green OA policy as a model worldwide, instead of diverting attention and energy to the needless and premature endgame of Gold OA within its own subfields. (5) Paying for Gold OA in a hybrid-Gold journal is indeed double-payment while subscriptions are still paying all publication costs. (6) I criticise depositing in CRs instead of depositing in Institutional Repositories (IRs), especially mandating deposit in CRs instead of in IRs. (7) I have no wish to vye for priority for the term "open access". I used "free online access" for years without feeling any pressing need for a more formal term of art. (8) Yes I (and no doubt others too, independently) mooted the notion of journals funded by means other than the subscription model (later to become Gold OA) in 1997 and even earlier (1994); but I never for a microsecond thought Gold OA would come before Green OA. And it hasn't; nor will it.
open access, self-archiving, library budgets, green OA, gold OA, institutional repositories, publication costs, publishing reform, peer review
s.n.
Harnad, Stevan
442ee520-71a1-4283-8e01-106693487d8b
Harnad, Stevan (2007) Cure Gold Fever With Green Deposits s.n.

Harnad, Stevan (2007) Cure Gold Fever With Green Deposits s.n.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

This is a reply to Matt Hodgkinson's posting in his journalology blog: (1) The Immediate-Deposit/Optional-Access (ID/OA) Mandate is a compromise deliberately designed to end deadlocks delaying the adoption of self-archiving mandates, by making publisher copyright policies or embargoes moot. It is not a substitute for OA but an accelerator toward OA. (2) There is no discovery problem with articles that have been deposited in OAI-compliant Institutional Repositories (IRs) . The discovery problem is with the articles that have not been deposited. (3) I don't criticise those who say Gold OA will lower publication costs. (I think it will too, eventually.) I criticise those who keep perseverating with Gold OA and costs while usage and impact continue to be lost and Green OA mandates (or ID/OA) can already put an immediate end to that loss, once and for all, right now. (4) CERN could have done a far greater service for other disciplines and for the growth of OA if it had put its weight and energy behind promoting its own own Green OA policy as a model worldwide, instead of diverting attention and energy to the needless and premature endgame of Gold OA within its own subfields. (5) Paying for Gold OA in a hybrid-Gold journal is indeed double-payment while subscriptions are still paying all publication costs. (6) I criticise depositing in CRs instead of depositing in Institutional Repositories (IRs), especially mandating deposit in CRs instead of in IRs. (7) I have no wish to vye for priority for the term "open access". I used "free online access" for years without feeling any pressing need for a more formal term of art. (8) Yes I (and no doubt others too, independently) mooted the notion of journals funded by means other than the subscription model (later to become Gold OA) in 1997 and even earlier (1994); but I never for a microsecond thought Gold OA would come before Green OA. And it hasn't; nor will it.

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More information

Published date: May 2007
Additional Information: Commentary On: http://journalology.blogspot.com/2007/04/archivangelism-has-means-become-end.html
Keywords: open access, self-archiving, library budgets, green OA, gold OA, institutional repositories, publication costs, publishing reform, peer review
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 263965
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/263965
PURE UUID: 75daa30d-d3f0-4f01-a11e-3760b481f113

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 May 2007
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 07:40

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Contributors

Author: Stevan Harnad

University divisions

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