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No Need for Canadian PubMed Central: CIHR Should Mandate IR Deposit

No Need for Canadian PubMed Central: CIHR Should Mandate IR Deposit
No Need for Canadian PubMed Central: CIHR Should Mandate IR Deposit
What is needed for Canadian biomedical research output isn't yet another (this time Canadian) PubMed Central: What is needed is that all Canadian (and US and UK) biomedical research output (as well as all the output of all the other scientific and scholarly disciplines, worldwide) should be made Open Access (OA) for all users, webwide. And the way to accomplish that is for the institutions and funders of the researchers to mandate that they deposit each article, immediately upon acceptance for publication, into each author's own OA Institutional Repository (IR). That is the solution that will systematically scale up to cover all research, from all institutions, across all fields, across all countries -- not the creation, willy-nilly, of central repositories like PubMed Central to deposit it into directly. PubMed Central should instead be a central OAI harvester, harvesting the biomedical research output of all the (distributed, local) IRs. Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) should think twice, and then lead, clear-headedly, instead of following, blindly, in this.
open access, self-archiving, mandates, Institutional Repositories, research policy, Canadian Institutes of Health Research
s.n.
Harnad, Stevan
442ee520-71a1-4283-8e01-106693487d8b
Harnad, Stevan (2007) No Need for Canadian PubMed Central: CIHR Should Mandate IR Deposit s.n.

Harnad, Stevan (2007) No Need for Canadian PubMed Central: CIHR Should Mandate IR Deposit s.n.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

What is needed for Canadian biomedical research output isn't yet another (this time Canadian) PubMed Central: What is needed is that all Canadian (and US and UK) biomedical research output (as well as all the output of all the other scientific and scholarly disciplines, worldwide) should be made Open Access (OA) for all users, webwide. And the way to accomplish that is for the institutions and funders of the researchers to mandate that they deposit each article, immediately upon acceptance for publication, into each author's own OA Institutional Repository (IR). That is the solution that will systematically scale up to cover all research, from all institutions, across all fields, across all countries -- not the creation, willy-nilly, of central repositories like PubMed Central to deposit it into directly. PubMed Central should instead be a central OAI harvester, harvesting the biomedical research output of all the (distributed, local) IRs. Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) should think twice, and then lead, clear-headedly, instead of following, blindly, in this.

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More information

Published date: June 2007
Additional Information: Commentary On: http://blogs.openmedicine.ca/node/23
Keywords: open access, self-archiving, mandates, Institutional Repositories, research policy, Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 264173
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/264173
PURE UUID: 995cae2d-b70a-441b-8071-b19f3de54570

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Jun 2007
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 07:39

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Contributors

Author: Stevan Harnad

University divisions

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