The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Enhancing the efficacy of a weak allogeneic melanoma vaccine by viral fusogenic membrane glycoprotein-mediated tumor cell-tumor cell fusion

Enhancing the efficacy of a weak allogeneic melanoma vaccine by viral fusogenic membrane glycoprotein-mediated tumor cell-tumor cell fusion
Enhancing the efficacy of a weak allogeneic melanoma vaccine by viral fusogenic membrane glycoprotein-mediated tumor cell-tumor cell fusion
We have investigated how to make K1735 cells, a poor allogeneic melanoma vaccine, more effective for protection against B16 in vivo. To promote antigen release in an immunologically effective manner, tumor cells were transfected with a viral fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein), which kills cells through the formation, and degeneration, of large multinucleated syncytia.
Vaccines consisting of a 1:1 mix of fusing allogeneic and autologous cells led to dramatic increases in survival of mice in both prophylactic and therapy models, dependent upon T cells, the mechanism of tumor-tumor cell fusion, and the nature of the fusion partner.
Syncytia activate macrophages and fusogenic membrane glycoprotein-mediated cell killing very efficiently promotes cross-priming of immature dendritic cells with a model tumor antigen. Our data suggest that the unique manner in which syncytia develop and die provides a highly effective pathway for tumor antigen release and presentation to the immune system and offers a novel mechanism by which cancer cell vaccines may be prepared for clinical use.
0008-5472
5495-5504
Linardakis, Emmanouela
a6f40ff3-4458-4f60-b474-58c82585db98
Bateman, Andrew
a851558d-8b9b-4020-b148-a239c2b26815
Phan, Vy
d0420994-e12f-4fad-a454-bee8d9bf9193
Ahmed, Atique
e60022bd-e2d5-42a3-bb22-8ba40e341407
Gough, Michael
690f0c98-228c-479d-9cec-3415a93467e7
Olivier, Keneth
6f07e879-3a51-4852-b72f-e62c30d8e12a
Kennedy, Rick
7bc5e08e-2a9f-4021-b19f-4473dae69fcc
Errington, Fiona
a73395e9-c5db-4352-9b74-603142bbedca
Harrington, Kevin J.
770bae54-a62c-49a6-bf51-5df1349685c4
Melcher, Alan
68cc1c3e-8ad3-4d82-b1fa-c2a46d05c7ba
Vile, Richard
a2252a95-3f21-447f-ab45-c7fcc888151f
Linardakis, Emmanouela
a6f40ff3-4458-4f60-b474-58c82585db98
Bateman, Andrew
a851558d-8b9b-4020-b148-a239c2b26815
Phan, Vy
d0420994-e12f-4fad-a454-bee8d9bf9193
Ahmed, Atique
e60022bd-e2d5-42a3-bb22-8ba40e341407
Gough, Michael
690f0c98-228c-479d-9cec-3415a93467e7
Olivier, Keneth
6f07e879-3a51-4852-b72f-e62c30d8e12a
Kennedy, Rick
7bc5e08e-2a9f-4021-b19f-4473dae69fcc
Errington, Fiona
a73395e9-c5db-4352-9b74-603142bbedca
Harrington, Kevin J.
770bae54-a62c-49a6-bf51-5df1349685c4
Melcher, Alan
68cc1c3e-8ad3-4d82-b1fa-c2a46d05c7ba
Vile, Richard
a2252a95-3f21-447f-ab45-c7fcc888151f

Linardakis, Emmanouela, Bateman, Andrew, Phan, Vy, Ahmed, Atique, Gough, Michael, Olivier, Keneth, Kennedy, Rick, Errington, Fiona, Harrington, Kevin J., Melcher, Alan and Vile, Richard (2002) Enhancing the efficacy of a weak allogeneic melanoma vaccine by viral fusogenic membrane glycoprotein-mediated tumor cell-tumor cell fusion. Cancer Research, 62 (19), 5495-5504.

Record type: Article

Abstract

We have investigated how to make K1735 cells, a poor allogeneic melanoma vaccine, more effective for protection against B16 in vivo. To promote antigen release in an immunologically effective manner, tumor cells were transfected with a viral fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein), which kills cells through the formation, and degeneration, of large multinucleated syncytia.
Vaccines consisting of a 1:1 mix of fusing allogeneic and autologous cells led to dramatic increases in survival of mice in both prophylactic and therapy models, dependent upon T cells, the mechanism of tumor-tumor cell fusion, and the nature of the fusion partner.
Syncytia activate macrophages and fusogenic membrane glycoprotein-mediated cell killing very efficiently promotes cross-priming of immature dendritic cells with a model tumor antigen. Our data suggest that the unique manner in which syncytia develop and die provides a highly effective pathway for tumor antigen release and presentation to the immune system and offers a novel mechanism by which cancer cell vaccines may be prepared for clinical use.

Text
5495.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 1 October 2002

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 26439
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/26439
ISSN: 0008-5472
PURE UUID: 0efaf92a-6a21-40eb-af0c-e5395b2383f5

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Apr 2006
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 19:05

Export record

Contributors

Author: Emmanouela Linardakis
Author: Andrew Bateman
Author: Vy Phan
Author: Atique Ahmed
Author: Michael Gough
Author: Keneth Olivier
Author: Rick Kennedy
Author: Fiona Errington
Author: Kevin J. Harrington
Author: Alan Melcher
Author: Richard Vile

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×