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Wicked Problems and Gnarly Results: Reflecting on Design and Evaluation Methods for Idiosyncratic Personal Information Management Tasks

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

This paper is a case study of an artifact design and evaluation process; it is a reflection on how right thinking about design methods may at times result in sub-optimal results. Our goal has been to assess our decision making process throughout the design and evaluation stages for a software prototype in order to consider where design methodology may need to be tuned to be more sensitive to the domain of practice, in this case software evaluation in personal information management. In particular, we reflect on design methods around (1) scale of prototype, (2) prototyping and design process, (3) study design, and (4) study population.

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Citation

Bernstein, Michael, Van Kleek, Max, Karger, David and schraefel, m.c. (2007) Wicked Problems and Gnarly Results: Reflecting on Design and Evaluation Methods for Idiosyncratic Personal Information Management Tasks s.n.

More information

Published date: 2007
Keywords: evaluation, design, methods, methodology
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 264668
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/264668
PURE UUID: f089ab2b-ddc9-4b87-9ff3-107bc6f410c1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Oct 2007
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 07:33

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Contributors

Author: Michael Bernstein
Author: Max Van Kleek
Author: David Karger
Author: m.c. schraefel

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