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Spontaneous and induced aneuploidy, considerations which may influence chromosome malsegregation

Spontaneous and induced aneuploidy, considerations which may influence chromosome malsegregation
Spontaneous and induced aneuploidy, considerations which may influence chromosome malsegregation
Aneuploidy plays a major role in the production of human birth defects and is becoming increasingly recognised as a critical event in the etiology of a wide range of human cancers. Thus, the detection of aneuploidy and the characterisation of the mechanisms which lead to chromosome malsegregation is an important area of genotoxicological research. As an aid to aneuploidy research, methods have been developed to analyse the mechanisms of chromosome malsegregation and to investigate the role of aneuploidy in tumour progression. The presence of aneuploid cells is a common characteristic of many of tumour cell types as illustrated by the wide range of chromosome number changes detected in post-menopausal breast tumours. To investigate the time of occurrence of aneuploidy during tumour progression, we have studied the chromosome number status of Syrian hamster dermal (SHD) cells cultures progressing to morphological transformation. The production of both polyploid and aneuploid cells is a common feature of progressing cells in this model. The elevation of both progression to morphological transformation and aneuploid frequencies can be produced by exposure to a diverse range of carcinogens and tumour promoters. Analysis of the genotoxic activity of the hormone 17-beta oestradiol demonstrated its ability to induce both chromosome loss and non-disjunction in human lymphoblastoid cells implicating aneugenic activity in hormone related cancers. Mutations in the p53 tumour suppressor gene introduced into human fibroblasts produced modifications in chromosome separation at mitosis which may lead to the production of both aneuploidy and polyploid cells. Our studies indicate that the production of aneuploid cells can be influenced by both endogenous and exogenous factors and occur throughout the progression of normal cells to a malignant phenotype.
aneuploidy, cancer, transformation, aneugenic chemicals
0027-5107
119-129
Parry, James M.
428e12b5-e1b3-4f0f-aae3-e1d3255c2721
Al-Obaidly, A.
f5d6ae49-f225-4513-be1f-e77ce81856c4
Al-Walhaib, M.
63ee3e3f-fb26-45fd-a22a-0a134039329e
Kayani, M.
b78f3ae1-6569-4242-8d11-24a258ea62d7
Nabeel, T.
d6c49632-b2cf-4287-81f2-797f213f3657
Strefford, J.
b104b9b7-dee7-44f5-8f8c-816e7fbedb56
Parry, E.M.
fb16932a-ba4b-483b-9aca-9a23a9d79d64
Parry, James M.
428e12b5-e1b3-4f0f-aae3-e1d3255c2721
Al-Obaidly, A.
f5d6ae49-f225-4513-be1f-e77ce81856c4
Al-Walhaib, M.
63ee3e3f-fb26-45fd-a22a-0a134039329e
Kayani, M.
b78f3ae1-6569-4242-8d11-24a258ea62d7
Nabeel, T.
d6c49632-b2cf-4287-81f2-797f213f3657
Strefford, J.
b104b9b7-dee7-44f5-8f8c-816e7fbedb56
Parry, E.M.
fb16932a-ba4b-483b-9aca-9a23a9d79d64

Parry, James M., Al-Obaidly, A., Al-Walhaib, M., Kayani, M., Nabeel, T., Strefford, J. and Parry, E.M. (2002) Spontaneous and induced aneuploidy, considerations which may influence chromosome malsegregation. Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis, 504 (1-2), 119-129. (doi:10.1016/S0027-5107(02)00085-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aneuploidy plays a major role in the production of human birth defects and is becoming increasingly recognised as a critical event in the etiology of a wide range of human cancers. Thus, the detection of aneuploidy and the characterisation of the mechanisms which lead to chromosome malsegregation is an important area of genotoxicological research. As an aid to aneuploidy research, methods have been developed to analyse the mechanisms of chromosome malsegregation and to investigate the role of aneuploidy in tumour progression. The presence of aneuploid cells is a common characteristic of many of tumour cell types as illustrated by the wide range of chromosome number changes detected in post-menopausal breast tumours. To investigate the time of occurrence of aneuploidy during tumour progression, we have studied the chromosome number status of Syrian hamster dermal (SHD) cells cultures progressing to morphological transformation. The production of both polyploid and aneuploid cells is a common feature of progressing cells in this model. The elevation of both progression to morphological transformation and aneuploid frequencies can be produced by exposure to a diverse range of carcinogens and tumour promoters. Analysis of the genotoxic activity of the hormone 17-beta oestradiol demonstrated its ability to induce both chromosome loss and non-disjunction in human lymphoblastoid cells implicating aneugenic activity in hormone related cancers. Mutations in the p53 tumour suppressor gene introduced into human fibroblasts produced modifications in chromosome separation at mitosis which may lead to the production of both aneuploidy and polyploid cells. Our studies indicate that the production of aneuploid cells can be influenced by both endogenous and exogenous factors and occur throughout the progression of normal cells to a malignant phenotype.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Additional Information: Chromosomal Aberrations: Perspectives for the 21st Century
Keywords: aneuploidy, cancer, transformation, aneugenic chemicals

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 26515
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/26515
ISSN: 0027-5107
PURE UUID: 30528127-2bc2-445e-a6bf-93f05c6699cb

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Date deposited: 21 Apr 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:13

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Contributors

Author: James M. Parry
Author: A. Al-Obaidly
Author: M. Al-Walhaib
Author: M. Kayani
Author: T. Nabeel
Author: J. Strefford
Author: E.M. Parry

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