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Analytical and numerical modeling methods for impedance analysis of single cells on-chip

Analytical and numerical modeling methods for impedance analysis of single cells on-chip
Analytical and numerical modeling methods for impedance analysis of single cells on-chip
Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a noninvasive method for characterizing the dielectric properties of biological particles. The technique can differentiate between cell types and provide information on cell properties through measurement of the permittivity and conductivity of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In terms of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology, cells pass sequentially through the microfluidic channel at high speed and are analyzed individually, rather than as traditionally done on a mixture of particles in suspension. This paper describes the analytical and numerical modeling methods for EIS of single cell analysis in a microfluidic cytometer. The presented modeling methods include Maxwell’s mixture theory, equivalent circuit model and finite element method. The difference and advantages of these methods have been discussed. The modeling work has covered the static case — an immobilized cell in suspension and the dynamic case — a moving cell in the channel.
55-63
Sun, Tao
b2f8e932-a7e6-4fe7-94dd-5c4ce725eacb
Green, Nicolas G
d9b47269-c426-41fd-a41d-5f4579faa581
Morgan, Hywel
de00d59f-a5a2-48c4-a99a-1d5dd7854174
Sun, Tao
b2f8e932-a7e6-4fe7-94dd-5c4ce725eacb
Green, Nicolas G
d9b47269-c426-41fd-a41d-5f4579faa581
Morgan, Hywel
de00d59f-a5a2-48c4-a99a-1d5dd7854174

Sun, Tao, Green, Nicolas G and Morgan, Hywel (2008) Analytical and numerical modeling methods for impedance analysis of single cells on-chip. Nano, 3 (1), 55-63. (doi:10.1142/S1793292008000800).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a noninvasive method for characterizing the dielectric properties of biological particles. The technique can differentiate between cell types and provide information on cell properties through measurement of the permittivity and conductivity of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In terms of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology, cells pass sequentially through the microfluidic channel at high speed and are analyzed individually, rather than as traditionally done on a mixture of particles in suspension. This paper describes the analytical and numerical modeling methods for EIS of single cell analysis in a microfluidic cytometer. The presented modeling methods include Maxwell’s mixture theory, equivalent circuit model and finite element method. The difference and advantages of these methods have been discussed. The modeling work has covered the static case — an immobilized cell in suspension and the dynamic case — a moving cell in the channel.

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Published date: 6 March 2008
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 265301
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/265301
PURE UUID: 5bc9ba12-aff6-4c28-9230-5ed599c03501
ORCID for Nicolas G Green: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9230-4455
ORCID for Hywel Morgan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4850-5676

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Mar 2008 10:57
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:47

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Contributors

Author: Tao Sun
Author: Nicolas G Green ORCID iD
Author: Hywel Morgan ORCID iD

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