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Iterative learning control of FES applied to the upper extremity for rehabilitation

Iterative learning control of FES applied to the upper extremity for rehabilitation
Iterative learning control of FES applied to the upper extremity for rehabilitation
In this paper iterative learning control schemes are used to apply functional electrical stimulation to the triceps of unimpaired subjects in order to perform trajectory tracking tasks. The subjects supply no voluntary effort and a robotic workstation is used to constrain their movement, impose known dynamics at the point of interaction with the robot, and provide assistive torque about the shoulder. Results from eighteen subjects are presented and show that a high level of performance can be achieved using the proposed method. In addition to illustrating how stimulation and robotics can be successfully combined in order to perform reaching tasks, the results provide justification for the system to be subsequently used by stroke patients for rehabilitation.
iterative learning control, functional electrical stimulation, robotics, tracking control, muscle models
0967-0661
368-381
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Burridge, Jane
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Chappell, Paul
2d2ec52b-e5d0-4c36-ac20-0a86589a880e
Lewin, Paul
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Burridge, Jane
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Chappell, Paul
2d2ec52b-e5d0-4c36-ac20-0a86589a880e
Lewin, Paul
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72

Freeman, Christopher, Hughes, Ann-Marie, Burridge, Jane, Chappell, Paul, Lewin, Paul and Rogers, Eric (2009) Iterative learning control of FES applied to the upper extremity for rehabilitation. Control Engineering Practice, 17 (3), 368-381.

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this paper iterative learning control schemes are used to apply functional electrical stimulation to the triceps of unimpaired subjects in order to perform trajectory tracking tasks. The subjects supply no voluntary effort and a robotic workstation is used to constrain their movement, impose known dynamics at the point of interaction with the robot, and provide assistive torque about the shoulder. Results from eighteen subjects are presented and show that a high level of performance can be achieved using the proposed method. In addition to illustrating how stimulation and robotics can be successfully combined in order to perform reaching tasks, the results provide justification for the system to be subsequently used by stroke patients for rehabilitation.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 21 October 2008
Published date: March 2009
Keywords: iterative learning control, functional electrical stimulation, robotics, tracking control, muscle models
Organisations: EEE, Southampton Wireless Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 265314
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/265314
ISSN: 0967-0661
PURE UUID: 3e52be03-e52d-4188-b10b-a44c5acaeb59
ORCID for Ann-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for Jane Burridge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3497-6725

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Mar 2008 17:58
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:59

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