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Re-education of upper limb function post stroke, using Iterative Learning Control (ILC) mediated by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)

Re-education of upper limb function post stroke, using Iterative Learning Control (ILC) mediated by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)
Re-education of upper limb function post stroke, using Iterative Learning Control (ILC) mediated by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)
Re-education of upper limb function post stroke, using Iterative Learning Control (ILC) mediated by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Introduction Current opinion in motor learning, reinforced by clinical evidence, supports the use of FES and robot therapy to improve motor control (i-iii). ILC is a technique applicable to processes which repeatedly perform a task with a view to sequentially improving accuracy such as trajectory following in robots. The aim of this project is to test the feasibility of applying ILC to neurological rehabilitation. Method 5 hemiplegic stroke subjects used a robotic workstation to track 2 dimensional trajectories, over 18 treatment sessions. ILC was used to govern the FES applied to their triceps muscles in terms of timing and amplitude to improve tracking performance, whilst encouraging a maximal voluntary contribution to the task. Results Differences in muscle activation patterns were observed between unimpaired and hemiplegic subjects. Improvements were recorded in isometric strength and unassisted performance of the tracking tasks in 4 out of the 5 hemiplegic subjects. Conclusion ILC mediated by FES enabled stroke subjects to accurately track a range of trajectories. Over time this related to an improvement in motor control reflected by increasing accuracy observed in unassisted tracking. References (i) De Kroon, J. R., van der Lee, J. H., Izerman, M. J., & Lankhorst, G. J. 2002, Clinical Rehabilitation, vol. 16, pp. 350-360. (ii) Schmidt, R. A. & Lee, T. D. Motor control and learning a behavioural emphasis. 3rd Edition. 261-285. 1999. Human Kinetics. (iii) Kwakkel, G., Kollen, B. J., & Krebs H.I 2008, Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 22, pp. 111-121.
343-343
Hughes, Ann-Marie
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Burridge, Jane
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Freeman, Christopher
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Chappell, Paul
2d2ec52b-e5d0-4c36-ac20-0a86589a880e
Lewin, Paul
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Burridge, Jane
7c453775-c3ae-4d55-99af-2ed8600ca680
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Chappell, Paul
2d2ec52b-e5d0-4c36-ac20-0a86589a880e
Lewin, Paul
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72

Hughes, Ann-Marie, Burridge, Jane, Freeman, Christopher, Chappell, Paul, Lewin, Paul and Rogers, Eric (2008) Re-education of upper limb function post stroke, using Iterative Learning Control (ILC) mediated by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). 6th World Stroke Congress, Austria. 24 - 27 Sep 2008. p. 343 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Re-education of upper limb function post stroke, using Iterative Learning Control (ILC) mediated by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Introduction Current opinion in motor learning, reinforced by clinical evidence, supports the use of FES and robot therapy to improve motor control (i-iii). ILC is a technique applicable to processes which repeatedly perform a task with a view to sequentially improving accuracy such as trajectory following in robots. The aim of this project is to test the feasibility of applying ILC to neurological rehabilitation. Method 5 hemiplegic stroke subjects used a robotic workstation to track 2 dimensional trajectories, over 18 treatment sessions. ILC was used to govern the FES applied to their triceps muscles in terms of timing and amplitude to improve tracking performance, whilst encouraging a maximal voluntary contribution to the task. Results Differences in muscle activation patterns were observed between unimpaired and hemiplegic subjects. Improvements were recorded in isometric strength and unassisted performance of the tracking tasks in 4 out of the 5 hemiplegic subjects. Conclusion ILC mediated by FES enabled stroke subjects to accurately track a range of trajectories. Over time this related to an improvement in motor control reflected by increasing accuracy observed in unassisted tracking. References (i) De Kroon, J. R., van der Lee, J. H., Izerman, M. J., & Lankhorst, G. J. 2002, Clinical Rehabilitation, vol. 16, pp. 350-360. (ii) Schmidt, R. A. & Lee, T. D. Motor control and learning a behavioural emphasis. 3rd Edition. 261-285. 1999. Human Kinetics. (iii) Kwakkel, G., Kollen, B. J., & Krebs H.I 2008, Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 22, pp. 111-121.

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Published date: 19 September 2008
Additional Information: Event Dates: Sept 24-27
Venue - Dates: 6th World Stroke Congress, Austria, 2008-09-24 - 2008-09-27
Organisations: EEE, Southampton Wireless Group

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Local EPrints ID: 265331
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/265331
PURE UUID: 1031dc8a-20aa-4d1b-900f-7234bc370ee0
ORCID for Ann-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for Eric Rogers: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0179-9398

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Date deposited: 02 May 2008 14:50
Last modified: 14 Jun 2019 00:39

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Contributors

Author: Jane Burridge
Author: Christopher Freeman
Author: Paul Chappell
Author: Paul Lewin
Author: Eric Rogers ORCID iD

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