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Longer fixation duration while viewing face images

Longer fixation duration while viewing face images
Longer fixation duration while viewing face images
The spatio-temporal properties of saccadic eye movements can be influenced by the cognitive demand and the characteristics of the observed scene. Probably due to its crucial role in social communication, it is argued that face perception may involve different cognitive processes compared with non-face object or scene perception. In this study, we investigated whether and how face and natural scene images can influence the patterns of visuomotor activity. We recorded monkeys’ saccadic eye movements as they freely viewed monkey face and natural scene images. The face and natural scene images attracted similar number of fixations, but viewing of faces was accompanied by longer fixations compared with natural scenes. These longer fixations were dependent on the context of facial features. The duration of fixations directed at facial contours decreased when the face images were scrambled, and increased at the later stage of normal face viewing. The results suggest that face and natural scene images can generate different patterns of visuomotor activity. The extra fixation duration on faces may be correlated with the detailed analysis of facial features
0014-4819
91-98
Guo, Kun
b0139c51-daaf-4e64-80b3-f8d406338c13
Mahmoodi, Sasan
91ca8da4-95dc-4c1e-ac0e-f2c08d6ac7cf
Robertson, Robert
9a5cce23-88d0-4c43-8a12-a2235d16507d
Young, Malcolm
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Guo, Kun
b0139c51-daaf-4e64-80b3-f8d406338c13
Mahmoodi, Sasan
91ca8da4-95dc-4c1e-ac0e-f2c08d6ac7cf
Robertson, Robert
9a5cce23-88d0-4c43-8a12-a2235d16507d
Young, Malcolm
50aa9e9e-b773-49e9-ad17-bd4ac57b5ef3

Guo, Kun, Mahmoodi, Sasan, Robertson, Robert and Young, Malcolm (2006) Longer fixation duration while viewing face images. Experimental Brain Research, 171, 91-98.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The spatio-temporal properties of saccadic eye movements can be influenced by the cognitive demand and the characteristics of the observed scene. Probably due to its crucial role in social communication, it is argued that face perception may involve different cognitive processes compared with non-face object or scene perception. In this study, we investigated whether and how face and natural scene images can influence the patterns of visuomotor activity. We recorded monkeys’ saccadic eye movements as they freely viewed monkey face and natural scene images. The face and natural scene images attracted similar number of fixations, but viewing of faces was accompanied by longer fixations compared with natural scenes. These longer fixations were dependent on the context of facial features. The duration of fixations directed at facial contours decreased when the face images were scrambled, and increased at the later stage of normal face viewing. The results suggest that face and natural scene images can generate different patterns of visuomotor activity. The extra fixation duration on faces may be correlated with the detailed analysis of facial features

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Published date: January 2006
Organisations: Southampton Wireless Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 265879
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/265879
ISSN: 0014-4819
PURE UUID: 1da39787-1029-4e85-883a-cabb02cca864

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Date deposited: 10 Jun 2008 10:10
Last modified: 25 Nov 2019 21:00

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Contributors

Author: Kun Guo
Author: Sasan Mahmoodi
Author: Robert Robertson
Author: Malcolm Young

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