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Collective User Behaviour and Tag Contextualisation in Folksonomies

Collective User Behaviour and Tag Contextualisation in Folksonomies
Collective User Behaviour and Tag Contextualisation in Folksonomies
Collaborative tagging systems have emerged in recent years to become popular tools for organising information on the Web. While collaborative tagging offers many advantages, they also suffer from several limitations, with a major one being the existence of ambiguous tags. To understand what an ambiguous tag is intended to mean, we need to know the contexts in which it is used. Instead of using common large scale clustering techniques on folksonomies, we believe tags can be better contextualised by the social contexts in which they are used. We propose a method to reveal semantics of ambiguous tags by studying the collective user behaviour in a tagging system. In this paper we describe our proposal and some results of our preliminary experiments. We also discuss the significance of the work and how it can be evaluated.
folksonomy, tagging, social bookmarking, semantics
659-662
Au Yeung, Ching Man
c83390b1-d3a1-459e-8f09-01c81576e066
Gibbins, Nicholas
98efd447-4aa7-411c-86d1-955a612eceac
Shadbolt, Nigel
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7
Au Yeung, Ching Man
c83390b1-d3a1-459e-8f09-01c81576e066
Gibbins, Nicholas
98efd447-4aa7-411c-86d1-955a612eceac
Shadbolt, Nigel
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7

Au Yeung, Ching Man, Gibbins, Nicholas and Shadbolt, Nigel (2008) Collective User Behaviour and Tag Contextualisation in Folksonomies. 2008 IEEE/WIC/ACM International Conference on Web Intelligence and Intelligent Agent Technology - Workshops, Australia. 09 - 12 Dec 2008. pp. 659-662 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Collaborative tagging systems have emerged in recent years to become popular tools for organising information on the Web. While collaborative tagging offers many advantages, they also suffer from several limitations, with a major one being the existence of ambiguous tags. To understand what an ambiguous tag is intended to mean, we need to know the contexts in which it is used. Instead of using common large scale clustering techniques on folksonomies, we believe tags can be better contextualised by the social contexts in which they are used. We propose a method to reveal semantics of ambiguous tags by studying the collective user behaviour in a tagging system. In this paper we describe our proposal and some results of our preliminary experiments. We also discuss the significance of the work and how it can be evaluated.

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More information

Published date: 9 December 2008
Additional Information: Event Dates: 9-12 December 2008
Venue - Dates: 2008 IEEE/WIC/ACM International Conference on Web Intelligence and Intelligent Agent Technology - Workshops, Australia, 2008-12-09 - 2008-12-12
Keywords: folksonomy, tagging, social bookmarking, semantics
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 266990
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/266990
PURE UUID: 90adae3d-85c5-4886-9777-a49b89275b40
ORCID for Nicholas Gibbins: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6140-9956

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Dec 2008 13:32
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:11

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Contributors

Author: Ching Man Au Yeung
Author: Nicholas Gibbins ORCID iD
Author: Nigel Shadbolt

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