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Self powered wireless sensors for condition monitoring applications

Self powered wireless sensors for condition monitoring applications
Self powered wireless sensors for condition monitoring applications
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of using kinetic energy harvesting to power wireless condition monitoring sensors. Design/methodology/approach – The system presented duty cycles its operation depending upon the energy being harvested. The harvested energy is stored on a supercapacitor and the system samples sufficient vibration data to enable an FFT to be performed at the receiver. Findings – The results of this study show it is perfectly feasible to power practical wireless condition monitoring sensors entirely from the vibrations of the machines being monitored. Originality/value – Energy harvesting techniques can be used to power wireless sensors in a range of applications. Removing the need for a battery power supply presents obvious environmental benefits and avoids the need to periodically replace batteries.
38-43
Owen, Thomas
5163420c-6106-4552-b1b0-9b5b9f9f3534
Kestermann, Stefan
276c96b7-f3f6-49b7-8bcf-415bf0659d17
Torah, Russel
7147b47b-db01-4124-95dc-90d6a9842688
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Owen, Thomas
5163420c-6106-4552-b1b0-9b5b9f9f3534
Kestermann, Stefan
276c96b7-f3f6-49b7-8bcf-415bf0659d17
Torah, Russel
7147b47b-db01-4124-95dc-90d6a9842688
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d

Owen, Thomas, Kestermann, Stefan, Torah, Russel and Beeby, Stephen (2009) Self powered wireless sensors for condition monitoring applications Sensor Review, 29, (1), pp. 38-43.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of using kinetic energy harvesting to power wireless condition monitoring sensors. Design/methodology/approach – The system presented duty cycles its operation depending upon the energy being harvested. The harvested energy is stored on a supercapacitor and the system samples sufficient vibration data to enable an FFT to be performed at the receiver. Findings – The results of this study show it is perfectly feasible to power practical wireless condition monitoring sensors entirely from the vibrations of the machines being monitored. Originality/value – Energy harvesting techniques can be used to power wireless sensors in a range of applications. Removing the need for a battery power supply presents obvious environmental benefits and avoids the need to periodically replace batteries.

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More information

Published date: 2009
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 267091
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/267091
PURE UUID: eba974de-aeeb-4a32-ace3-747cb68e81a9
ORCID for Stephen Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Feb 2009 11:22
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 07:08

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Contributors

Author: Thomas Owen
Author: Stefan Kestermann
Author: Russel Torah
Author: Stephen Beeby ORCID iD

University divisions

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