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One world, one web ... but great diversity

One world, one web ... but great diversity
One world, one web ... but great diversity
The mantra "One World, One Web" has a strong appeal to Web developers. They think of it as a design philosophy based on use of internationally agreed open standards for providing universal access to networked resources and services available on the World Wide Web. But does the available evidence show that practices match this philosophy? How would such an approach work in a Web 2.0 environment in which users may be authors of content? This paper reviews the limitations of the dependence on a single WAI model and WCAG 1.0 guidelines. It describes a holistic approach to Web accessibility that has been discussed previously. There are additional complexities of accessibility in a Web 2.0 environment, in which not only can readers be creators of Web resources in a variety of formats, but also content can be surfaced in a variety of ways, addressed in this paper. The authors describe how the holistic model, initially developed to support the development of accessible e-learning in a Web 2.0 context, is well-suited for a Web 2.0 environment. The paper provides a case study to illustrate how this holistic approach can be applied in the development of Web resources for users with learning difficulties. The paper concludes by arguing that future work to enhance the accessibility of Web services should focus on the development and commissioning processes rather than continue the current narrow emphasis on the compliance with universal accessibility guidelines of the digital resources themselves, independently of the context of their use. Finally, the paper refers to two new developments that support the wider focus, providing for individual user-centred accessibility with descriptions of resources and components enabling adaptation of resources to individual needs and preferences.
Web accessibility, people with disabilities, WAI, WCAG, guidelines, methodologies, AccessforAll, metadata
978-1-60558-153-8
141-147
Kelly, Brian
dabd527e-7be6-4383-9120-d23f083add70
Nevile, Liddy
048af0c0-0214-4736-97a5-e381e5ddd79a
Draffan, EA
021d4f4e-d269-4379-ba5a-7e2ffb73d2bf
Fanou, Sotiris
6ed47002-9a15-45a8-baf1-2b5f55bb3f91
Kelly, Brian
dabd527e-7be6-4383-9120-d23f083add70
Nevile, Liddy
048af0c0-0214-4736-97a5-e381e5ddd79a
Draffan, EA
021d4f4e-d269-4379-ba5a-7e2ffb73d2bf
Fanou, Sotiris
6ed47002-9a15-45a8-baf1-2b5f55bb3f91

Kelly, Brian, Nevile, Liddy, Draffan, EA and Fanou, Sotiris (2008) One world, one web ... but great diversity. At 2008 international cross-disciplinary conference on Web accessibility (W4A) 2008 international cross-disciplinary conference on Web accessibility (W4A). 21 - 22 Apr 2008. pp. 141-147.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The mantra "One World, One Web" has a strong appeal to Web developers. They think of it as a design philosophy based on use of internationally agreed open standards for providing universal access to networked resources and services available on the World Wide Web. But does the available evidence show that practices match this philosophy? How would such an approach work in a Web 2.0 environment in which users may be authors of content? This paper reviews the limitations of the dependence on a single WAI model and WCAG 1.0 guidelines. It describes a holistic approach to Web accessibility that has been discussed previously. There are additional complexities of accessibility in a Web 2.0 environment, in which not only can readers be creators of Web resources in a variety of formats, but also content can be surfaced in a variety of ways, addressed in this paper. The authors describe how the holistic model, initially developed to support the development of accessible e-learning in a Web 2.0 context, is well-suited for a Web 2.0 environment. The paper provides a case study to illustrate how this holistic approach can be applied in the development of Web resources for users with learning difficulties. The paper concludes by arguing that future work to enhance the accessibility of Web services should focus on the development and commissioning processes rather than continue the current narrow emphasis on the compliance with universal accessibility guidelines of the digital resources themselves, independently of the context of their use. Finally, the paper refers to two new developments that support the wider focus, providing for individual user-centred accessibility with descriptions of resources and components enabling adaptation of resources to individual needs and preferences.

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More information

Published date: 2008
Additional Information: Event Dates: 21 - 22 April 2008
Venue - Dates: 2008 international cross-disciplinary conference on Web accessibility (W4A), 2008-04-21 - 2008-04-22
Keywords: Web accessibility, people with disabilities, WAI, WCAG, guidelines, methodologies, AccessforAll, metadata
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 267205
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/267205
ISBN: 978-1-60558-153-8
PURE UUID: 85769f88-f7d5-433d-93aa-9dcc32dba4db

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Mar 2009 19:05
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 07:07

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Contributors

Author: Brian Kelly
Author: Liddy Nevile
Author: EA Draffan
Author: Sotiris Fanou

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