The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Extended Memory, the Extended Mind, and the Nature of Technology-Mediated Memory Enhancement

Extended Memory, the Extended Mind, and the Nature of Technology-Mediated Memory Enhancement
Extended Memory, the Extended Mind, and the Nature of Technology-Mediated Memory Enhancement
Human memory is a key focus of scientific and theoretical attention within a range of disciplines, and it is also an important target of efforts that seek to improve aspects of human cognitive function. The phenomenon of memory is also something that has been seen as a key test for theories of distributed, situated and extended cognition, not least because memory seems to take us out of the current situation and put us in psychological contact with a set of previously experienced state-of-affairs. In addition to the challenge posed to extended cognition accounts, memory also raises interesting issues when it comes to the potential impact of certain new techniques and technologies, all of which seem poised to exert some effect on our mnemonic functioning. For example, the increasing availability of life-logging technologies, coupled with the increasing use of the Web as a storage medium for personal data, raises important questions about the potential of the Web to ‘enhance’ our mnemonic capabilities. The aims of this particular paper are threefold. The first aim is to review the literature relating to cognitive extension and the extended mind and to illustrate how these ideas are relevant to the case of memory. A second aim is to consider the value of an extended cognition account in thinking about memory phenomena. The focus here is on the role played by external (non-biological) physical and social resources in shaping our mnemonic capabilities. A third and final aim for the paper is to consider a variety of issues related to the design of memory technologies. Important areas of discussion here include the extent to which memory technologies should aim to support the accurate recall of previously experienced information, as well as the role of biology in guiding the design of memory technologies.
memory, extended mind, cognitive extension, situated cognition, social networks, memory technology, distributed cognition, collaborative recall
Smart, Paul
cd8a3dbf-d963-4009-80fb-76ecc93579df
Smart, Paul
cd8a3dbf-d963-4009-80fb-76ecc93579df

(2010) Extended Memory, the Extended Mind, and the Nature of Technology-Mediated Memory Enhancement. 1st ITA Workshop on Network-Enabled Cognition: The Contribution of Social and Technological Networks to Human Cognition, United States.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Human memory is a key focus of scientific and theoretical attention within a range of disciplines, and it is also an important target of efforts that seek to improve aspects of human cognitive function. The phenomenon of memory is also something that has been seen as a key test for theories of distributed, situated and extended cognition, not least because memory seems to take us out of the current situation and put us in psychological contact with a set of previously experienced state-of-affairs. In addition to the challenge posed to extended cognition accounts, memory also raises interesting issues when it comes to the potential impact of certain new techniques and technologies, all of which seem poised to exert some effect on our mnemonic functioning. For example, the increasing availability of life-logging technologies, coupled with the increasing use of the Web as a storage medium for personal data, raises important questions about the potential of the Web to ‘enhance’ our mnemonic capabilities. The aims of this particular paper are threefold. The first aim is to review the literature relating to cognitive extension and the extended mind and to illustrate how these ideas are relevant to the case of memory. A second aim is to consider the value of an extended cognition account in thinking about memory phenomena. The focus here is on the role played by external (non-biological) physical and social resources in shaping our mnemonic capabilities. A third and final aim for the paper is to consider a variety of issues related to the design of memory technologies. Important areas of discussion here include the extent to which memory technologies should aim to support the accurate recall of previously experienced information, as well as the role of biology in guiding the design of memory technologies.

PDF
Extended_Memoryv13.pdf - Version of Record
Download (932kB)

More information

Published date: 31 March 2010
Additional Information: Event Dates: 22nd September 2009
Venue - Dates: 1st ITA Workshop on Network-Enabled Cognition: The Contribution of Social and Technological Networks to Human Cognition, United States, 2009-09-22
Keywords: memory, extended mind, cognitive extension, situated cognition, social networks, memory technology, distributed cognition, collaborative recall
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 267742
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/267742
PURE UUID: e3858d7a-c6ea-4cad-870d-1a77e1ec077c
ORCID for Paul Smart: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9989-5307

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Jun 2011 13:47
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:46

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×