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Selection of a suitable vegetable oil for high voltage insulation applications

Selection of a suitable vegetable oil for high voltage insulation applications
Selection of a suitable vegetable oil for high voltage insulation applications
Many items of high voltage plant employ a liquid both as a dielectric and a coolant. Currently these systems use a mineral oil, however, this suffers from the drawback of being potentially toxic and hence leakages and eventual disposal can be serious issues. To overcome this problem, an increasing trend in the UK is to backfill existing paper/oil cable systems with dodecylbenzene (DDB). This fluid possesses the advantages of improved gas absorption, good dielectric properties and biodegradability; nevertheless it is still derived from crude oil, a nonrenewable resource. Vegetable oils offer the added advantage of being renewable although many types are available with very different properties. In order to select a suitable vegetable oil for high voltage applications, a standardised ageing and testing regime is required. In this paper, a wide range of vegetable oils were subjected to controlled laboratory ageing and the resulting aged oils were characterised by a number of analytical techniques. The results from these tests were then used to rank the different oils, and to select the most ageing resistant oil.
1742-6588
1-5
Hosier, I L
6a44329e-b742-44de-afa7-073f80a78e26
Guushua, A
ef327fdf-588a-4fad-a0e0-6136c818e174
Vaughan, A S
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3
Swingler, S G
4f13fbb2-7d2e-480a-8687-acea6a4ed735
Hosier, I L
6a44329e-b742-44de-afa7-073f80a78e26
Guushua, A
ef327fdf-588a-4fad-a0e0-6136c818e174
Vaughan, A S
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3
Swingler, S G
4f13fbb2-7d2e-480a-8687-acea6a4ed735

Hosier, I L, Guushua, A, Vaughan, A S and Swingler, S G (2009) Selection of a suitable vegetable oil for high voltage insulation applications. Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 183 (12014), 1-5.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Many items of high voltage plant employ a liquid both as a dielectric and a coolant. Currently these systems use a mineral oil, however, this suffers from the drawback of being potentially toxic and hence leakages and eventual disposal can be serious issues. To overcome this problem, an increasing trend in the UK is to backfill existing paper/oil cable systems with dodecylbenzene (DDB). This fluid possesses the advantages of improved gas absorption, good dielectric properties and biodegradability; nevertheless it is still derived from crude oil, a nonrenewable resource. Vegetable oils offer the added advantage of being renewable although many types are available with very different properties. In order to select a suitable vegetable oil for high voltage applications, a standardised ageing and testing regime is required. In this paper, a wide range of vegetable oils were subjected to controlled laboratory ageing and the resulting aged oils were characterised by a number of analytical techniques. The results from these tests were then used to rank the different oils, and to select the most ageing resistant oil.

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Published date: August 2009
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 267845
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/267845
ISSN: 1742-6588
PURE UUID: 9402815b-59d4-4276-9fc4-015eb9a7d246
ORCID for I L Hosier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4365-9385
ORCID for A S Vaughan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0535-513X

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Date deposited: 10 Sep 2009 12:24
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:54

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Contributors

Author: I L Hosier ORCID iD
Author: A Guushua
Author: A S Vaughan ORCID iD
Author: S G Swingler

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