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Using Twitter to Assess Information Needs: Early Results

Using Twitter to Assess Information Needs: Early Results
Using Twitter to Assess Information Needs: Early Results
Information needs tell us why search terms are used, helping to disambiguate, for example, what exactly people are looking for with queries such as ‘Orange’ or ‘Java’. It is hard to understand goals and motivations, however, from the keywords entered into search engines alone. This paper discusses the pilot analysis of 180,000 tweets, containing search-related terms, to try and understand how people describe their own needs and goals. The early analysis shows that some terms academically associated with searching behaviours were infrequently used by twitter users, and that the use of terminology varied depending on the subject of search. The results also show that specific topics of searching tasks can be identified directly within tweets. Future analysis of the still on-going 5-month study will constitute more formal text analytical methods and try to build a corpus of real search tasks.
109-112
Wilson, Max L.
b34ab988-f78f-47bd-bf34-1a36be06b488
Wilson, Max L.
b34ab988-f78f-47bd-bf34-1a36be06b488

Wilson, Max L. (2009) Using Twitter to Assess Information Needs: Early Results. At HCIR'09 HCIR'09. pp. 109-112.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Information needs tell us why search terms are used, helping to disambiguate, for example, what exactly people are looking for with queries such as ‘Orange’ or ‘Java’. It is hard to understand goals and motivations, however, from the keywords entered into search engines alone. This paper discusses the pilot analysis of 180,000 tweets, containing search-related terms, to try and understand how people describe their own needs and goals. The early analysis shows that some terms academically associated with searching behaviours were infrequently used by twitter users, and that the use of terminology varied depending on the subject of search. The results also show that specific topics of searching tasks can be identified directly within tweets. Future analysis of the still on-going 5-month study will constitute more formal text analytical methods and try to build a corpus of real search tasks.

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More information

Published date: October 2009
Additional Information: Event Dates: 23rd October 2009
Venue - Dates: HCIR'09, 2009-10-23
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 267952
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/267952
PURE UUID: e4198d9b-7da3-431f-9034-3b43ff63ef95

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Sep 2009 14:30
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:58

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