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Chemokine expression in IBD. Mucosal chemokine expression is unselectively increased in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease

Chemokine expression in IBD. Mucosal chemokine expression is unselectively increased in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease
Chemokine expression in IBD. Mucosal chemokine expression is unselectively increased in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease
Mucosal changes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are characterized by ulcerative lesions accompanied by prominent cellular infiltrates in the bowel wall. Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that are able to promote leukocyte migration to areas of inflammation and are also able to initiate cell activation events. They have recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of many disease states. The aim of this study was to detail the degree and distribution of specific chemokines, interleukin (IL)-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, -2, and -3, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 and -1, in IBD mucosa. Thirty-nine patients were included, ten controls, 20 ulcerative colitis (UC), and nine Crohn's disease (CD), with a range of disease activity. Colonic mucosal biopsies were collected from UC, CD, and control patients and embedded in glycol methacrylate. Two-micrometre-thick sections were cut and stained using immunohistochemistry for chemokine protein expression. Sections were analysed using a light microscope. Expression of all types of chemokine protein was detected in colonic mucosa from both control and IBD patients.
Patterns of staining between IBD patients and controls differed significantly, but CD and UC patients demonstrated similar patterns of staining. Individual chemokine expression was found to be significantly up-regulated in IBD when patients were compared with the non-diseased group in all areas of the mucosal sections. Up-regulated chemokine expression correlated with increasing activity of the disease. It is concluded that human colonic chemokine expression is non-selectively up-regulated in IBD. The results supported the hypothesis that the degree of local inflammation and tissue damage in UC and CD is dependent on local expression of specific chemokines within IBD tissues.
crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, chemokines
1096-9896
28-35
Banks, Charmian
8cf64520-957e-4094-b712-3fd4ae117acb
Bateman, Adrian
35f5fef8-6358-42ff-b3c1-2ff226b4dc43
Payne, Richard
eeb95143-371b-4aba-bbf1-9a746876b305
Johnson, Penny
2b12fd7b-1388-425d-b40d-bc5583214eb4
Sheron, Nick
cbf852e3-cfaa-43b2-ab99-a954d96069f1
Banks, Charmian
8cf64520-957e-4094-b712-3fd4ae117acb
Bateman, Adrian
35f5fef8-6358-42ff-b3c1-2ff226b4dc43
Payne, Richard
eeb95143-371b-4aba-bbf1-9a746876b305
Johnson, Penny
2b12fd7b-1388-425d-b40d-bc5583214eb4
Sheron, Nick
cbf852e3-cfaa-43b2-ab99-a954d96069f1

Banks, Charmian, Bateman, Adrian, Payne, Richard, Johnson, Penny and Sheron, Nick (2003) Chemokine expression in IBD. Mucosal chemokine expression is unselectively increased in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The Journal of Pathology, 199 (1), 28-35. (doi:10.1002/path.1245).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Mucosal changes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are characterized by ulcerative lesions accompanied by prominent cellular infiltrates in the bowel wall. Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that are able to promote leukocyte migration to areas of inflammation and are also able to initiate cell activation events. They have recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of many disease states. The aim of this study was to detail the degree and distribution of specific chemokines, interleukin (IL)-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, -2, and -3, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 and -1, in IBD mucosa. Thirty-nine patients were included, ten controls, 20 ulcerative colitis (UC), and nine Crohn's disease (CD), with a range of disease activity. Colonic mucosal biopsies were collected from UC, CD, and control patients and embedded in glycol methacrylate. Two-micrometre-thick sections were cut and stained using immunohistochemistry for chemokine protein expression. Sections were analysed using a light microscope. Expression of all types of chemokine protein was detected in colonic mucosa from both control and IBD patients.
Patterns of staining between IBD patients and controls differed significantly, but CD and UC patients demonstrated similar patterns of staining. Individual chemokine expression was found to be significantly up-regulated in IBD when patients were compared with the non-diseased group in all areas of the mucosal sections. Up-regulated chemokine expression correlated with increasing activity of the disease. It is concluded that human colonic chemokine expression is non-selectively up-regulated in IBD. The results supported the hypothesis that the degree of local inflammation and tissue damage in UC and CD is dependent on local expression of specific chemokines within IBD tissues.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Additional Information: Original paper
Keywords: crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, chemokines

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 26926
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/26926
ISSN: 1096-9896
PURE UUID: 9ae45fd4-e990-46ad-b528-d0a9820f51a7
ORCID for Nick Sheron: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5232-8292

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Date deposited: 25 Apr 2006
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 20:36

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Contributors

Author: Charmian Banks
Author: Adrian Bateman
Author: Richard Payne
Author: Penny Johnson
Author: Nick Sheron ORCID iD

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