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Microdialysis - a model for studying chronic wounds

Microdialysis - a model for studying chronic wounds
Microdialysis - a model for studying chronic wounds
Microdialysis has been used for more than 20 years as a method of sampling the interstitial fluid space. It has been used in both animals and human tissues, in vivo. The principle of microdialysis is based on the passive diffusion of a compound along its concentration gradient. One major advantage of this sampling technique is that it is simple, relatively cheap, and minimally invasive. Consequently, microdialysis has been employed in a variety of research and clinical settings to recover endogenous molecules and metabolites from the tissue space. It has also been used to measure the tissue penetration of xenobiotics and to follow their temporal and spatial distribution. Most recently, microdialysis has begun to be used as a diagnostic tool and its application to clinical investigation at the bedside explored. This review describes the principles of the technique of microdialysis and its current uses in both an experimental and clinical setting. It goes on to consider current methods of wound fluid sampling and the range of bioactive molecules that have been detected in wound fluid recovered using these techniques. Finally, the use of microdialysis as a novel method for sampling wound fluid in vivo and its ability to provide a fluid that is unaffected by the sampling method and that is representative of the wound environment is discussed.
microdialysis, skin, wound fluid, chronic wounds
1534-7346
233-239
Clough, G.
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
Noble, M.
4e378bdb-6835-49a9-b5a8-2ae1a78c5e7f
Clough, G.
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
Noble, M.
4e378bdb-6835-49a9-b5a8-2ae1a78c5e7f

Clough, G. and Noble, M. (2003) Microdialysis - a model for studying chronic wounds. The International Journal of Lower Extremity Wounds, 2 (4), 233-239. (doi:10.1177/1534734603261124).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Microdialysis has been used for more than 20 years as a method of sampling the interstitial fluid space. It has been used in both animals and human tissues, in vivo. The principle of microdialysis is based on the passive diffusion of a compound along its concentration gradient. One major advantage of this sampling technique is that it is simple, relatively cheap, and minimally invasive. Consequently, microdialysis has been employed in a variety of research and clinical settings to recover endogenous molecules and metabolites from the tissue space. It has also been used to measure the tissue penetration of xenobiotics and to follow their temporal and spatial distribution. Most recently, microdialysis has begun to be used as a diagnostic tool and its application to clinical investigation at the bedside explored. This review describes the principles of the technique of microdialysis and its current uses in both an experimental and clinical setting. It goes on to consider current methods of wound fluid sampling and the range of bioactive molecules that have been detected in wound fluid recovered using these techniques. Finally, the use of microdialysis as a novel method for sampling wound fluid in vivo and its ability to provide a fluid that is unaffected by the sampling method and that is representative of the wound environment is discussed.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Keywords: microdialysis, skin, wound fluid, chronic wounds

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 26992
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/26992
ISSN: 1534-7346
PURE UUID: 28efaedf-daed-4d96-9c60-e62735edf1de
ORCID for G. Clough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6226-8964

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Apr 2006
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:02

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