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Frequency, severity, and duration of rhinovirus infections in asthmatic and non-asthmatic individuals: a longitudinal cohort study

Frequency, severity, and duration of rhinovirus infections in asthmatic and non-asthmatic individuals: a longitudinal cohort study
Frequency, severity, and duration of rhinovirus infections in asthmatic and non-asthmatic individuals: a longitudinal cohort study
Background: Rhinovirus infections cause exacerbations of asthma. We postulated that people with asthma are more susceptible to rhinovirus infection than people without the disease and compared the susceptibility of these groups.
Methods: We recruited 76 cohabiting couples. One person in every couple had atopic asthma and one was healthy. Participants completed daily diary cards of upper-respiratory-tract (URT) and lower-respiratory-tract (LRT) symptoms and measured peak expiratory flow twice daily. Every 2 weeks nasal aspirates were taken and examined for rhinovirus. Mixed models were used to compare risks of infection between groups. We also compared the severity and duration of infections.
Findings: We analysed 753 samples. Rhinovirus was detected in 10·1% (38/378) of samples from participants with asthma and 8·5% (32/375) of samples from healthy participants. After adjustment for confounding factors, asthma did not sinificantly increase risk of infection (odds ratio 1·15, 95% CI 0·71–1·87). Groups did not differ in frequency, severity, or duration of URT infections or symptoms associated with rhinovirus infection. First rhinovirus infection was associated more frequently with LRT infection in participants with asthma than in healthy individuals (12 of 28 infections vs four of 23, respectively, p=0·051). Symptoms of LRT associated with rhinovirus infection were sinificantly more severe (p=0·001) and longer-lasting in participants with asthma than in healthy participants (p=0·005).
Interpretation: People with atopic asthma are not at greater risk of rhinovirus infection than healthy individuals but suffer from more frequent LRT infections and have more severe and longer-lasting LRT symptoms.
0140-6736
831-834
Corne, Jonathan M.
f2d716a7-31f0-40a3-afb3-d86b850634ee
Marshall, Clare
35225b49-ef01-4544-8f9a-3ce569c9003b
Smith, Sandra
4cb052d0-306e-42be-8e60-86cda691e1bb
Schreiber, Jacquie
7f6fdad4-51e7-4719-ac7c-781e47897df5
Sanderson, Gwendolyn
300fa806-66ba-4481-8614-a77eec25d69e
Holgate, Stephen T.
2e7c17a9-6796-436e-8772-1fe6d2ac5edc
Johnston, Sebastian L.
90e0ef79-cfde-40e0-b301-90d3063ee036
Corne, Jonathan M.
f2d716a7-31f0-40a3-afb3-d86b850634ee
Marshall, Clare
35225b49-ef01-4544-8f9a-3ce569c9003b
Smith, Sandra
4cb052d0-306e-42be-8e60-86cda691e1bb
Schreiber, Jacquie
7f6fdad4-51e7-4719-ac7c-781e47897df5
Sanderson, Gwendolyn
300fa806-66ba-4481-8614-a77eec25d69e
Holgate, Stephen T.
2e7c17a9-6796-436e-8772-1fe6d2ac5edc
Johnston, Sebastian L.
90e0ef79-cfde-40e0-b301-90d3063ee036

Corne, Jonathan M., Marshall, Clare, Smith, Sandra, Schreiber, Jacquie, Sanderson, Gwendolyn, Holgate, Stephen T. and Johnston, Sebastian L. (2002) Frequency, severity, and duration of rhinovirus infections in asthmatic and non-asthmatic individuals: a longitudinal cohort study. The Lancet, 359 (9309), 831-834. (doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(02)07953-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Rhinovirus infections cause exacerbations of asthma. We postulated that people with asthma are more susceptible to rhinovirus infection than people without the disease and compared the susceptibility of these groups.
Methods: We recruited 76 cohabiting couples. One person in every couple had atopic asthma and one was healthy. Participants completed daily diary cards of upper-respiratory-tract (URT) and lower-respiratory-tract (LRT) symptoms and measured peak expiratory flow twice daily. Every 2 weeks nasal aspirates were taken and examined for rhinovirus. Mixed models were used to compare risks of infection between groups. We also compared the severity and duration of infections.
Findings: We analysed 753 samples. Rhinovirus was detected in 10·1% (38/378) of samples from participants with asthma and 8·5% (32/375) of samples from healthy participants. After adjustment for confounding factors, asthma did not sinificantly increase risk of infection (odds ratio 1·15, 95% CI 0·71–1·87). Groups did not differ in frequency, severity, or duration of URT infections or symptoms associated with rhinovirus infection. First rhinovirus infection was associated more frequently with LRT infection in participants with asthma than in healthy individuals (12 of 28 infections vs four of 23, respectively, p=0·051). Symptoms of LRT associated with rhinovirus infection were sinificantly more severe (p=0·001) and longer-lasting in participants with asthma than in healthy participants (p=0·005).
Interpretation: People with atopic asthma are not at greater risk of rhinovirus infection than healthy individuals but suffer from more frequent LRT infections and have more severe and longer-lasting LRT symptoms.

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Published date: 2002
Organisations: Infection Inflammation & Immunity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 27006
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/27006
ISSN: 0140-6736
PURE UUID: 5344c385-9d18-4c24-9471-2afebc763a4d

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Date deposited: 25 Apr 2006
Last modified: 05 Oct 2018 12:04

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