The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Studies of epidemiology and seroprevalence of bovine noroviruses in Germany

Studies of epidemiology and seroprevalence of bovine noroviruses in Germany
Studies of epidemiology and seroprevalence of bovine noroviruses in Germany
Jena virus (JV) is a bovine enteric calicivirus that causes diarrhea in calves. The virus is approximately 30 nm in diameter and has a surface morphology similar to the human Norwalk virus. The genome sequence of JV was recently described, and the virus has been assigned to the genus Norovirus of the family Caliciviridae. In the present study, the JV capsid gene encoded by open reading frame 2 was cloned into the baculovirus transfer vector pFastBac 1, and this was used to transform Escherichia coli to generate a recombinant bacmid. Transfection of insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus DNA resulted in expression of the JV capsid protein. The recombinant JV capsid protein undergoes self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) similar to JV virions in size and appearance. JV VLPs were released into the cell culture supernatant, concentrated, and then purified by CsCl equilibrium gradient centrifugation. Purified JV VLPs were used to hyperimmunize laboratory animals. An antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed and characterized initially with clinical specimens containing defined human noroviruses and bovine diarrheal samples from calves experimentally infected with JV; the ELISA was specific only for JV. The ELISA was used to screen 381 diarrheal samples collected from dairy herds in Thuringia, Hesse, and Bavaria, Germany, from 1999 to 2002; 34 of these samples (8.9%) were positive for JV infection. The unexpectedly high prevalence of JV was confirmed in a seroepidemiological study using 824 serum or plasma samples screened using an anti-JV ELISA, which showed that 99.1% of cattle from Thuringia have antibodies to JV.
0095-1137
2300-2305
Deng, Y.
da640cef-7414-4496-9f76-f5d1b928187d
Batten, C.A.
07bafbea-332e-4f02-8ad2-a083610669ae
Liu, B.L.
1e6ef423-fbfb-4c45-aee6-29b667878629
Lambden, P.R.
e99ecc21-50d7-4a43-9e79-efba46592c77
Elschner, M.
cb6b8361-157c-4662-ba96-e5021c066827
Gunther, H.
7d34c41c-368d-499f-9a66-4eb335ea53f5
Otto, P.
2c688616-0bf9-4c41-bda7-4fe9a4f7ca9e
Schnurch, P.
6aade0aa-d043-42fc-86b6-d387ca830a9e
Eichhorn, W.
f66c312a-8bc6-4026-964d-69730b9e11e7
Herbst, W.
3199161e-271a-4796-87af-e14dd8d9955b
Clarke, I.N.
ff6c9324-3547-4039-bb2c-10c0b3327a8b
Deng, Y.
da640cef-7414-4496-9f76-f5d1b928187d
Batten, C.A.
07bafbea-332e-4f02-8ad2-a083610669ae
Liu, B.L.
1e6ef423-fbfb-4c45-aee6-29b667878629
Lambden, P.R.
e99ecc21-50d7-4a43-9e79-efba46592c77
Elschner, M.
cb6b8361-157c-4662-ba96-e5021c066827
Gunther, H.
7d34c41c-368d-499f-9a66-4eb335ea53f5
Otto, P.
2c688616-0bf9-4c41-bda7-4fe9a4f7ca9e
Schnurch, P.
6aade0aa-d043-42fc-86b6-d387ca830a9e
Eichhorn, W.
f66c312a-8bc6-4026-964d-69730b9e11e7
Herbst, W.
3199161e-271a-4796-87af-e14dd8d9955b
Clarke, I.N.
ff6c9324-3547-4039-bb2c-10c0b3327a8b

Deng, Y., Batten, C.A., Liu, B.L., Lambden, P.R., Elschner, M., Gunther, H., Otto, P., Schnurch, P., Eichhorn, W., Herbst, W. and Clarke, I.N. (2003) Studies of epidemiology and seroprevalence of bovine noroviruses in Germany. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 41 (6), 2300-2305. (doi:10.1128/JCM.41.6.2300-2305.2003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Jena virus (JV) is a bovine enteric calicivirus that causes diarrhea in calves. The virus is approximately 30 nm in diameter and has a surface morphology similar to the human Norwalk virus. The genome sequence of JV was recently described, and the virus has been assigned to the genus Norovirus of the family Caliciviridae. In the present study, the JV capsid gene encoded by open reading frame 2 was cloned into the baculovirus transfer vector pFastBac 1, and this was used to transform Escherichia coli to generate a recombinant bacmid. Transfection of insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus DNA resulted in expression of the JV capsid protein. The recombinant JV capsid protein undergoes self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) similar to JV virions in size and appearance. JV VLPs were released into the cell culture supernatant, concentrated, and then purified by CsCl equilibrium gradient centrifugation. Purified JV VLPs were used to hyperimmunize laboratory animals. An antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed and characterized initially with clinical specimens containing defined human noroviruses and bovine diarrheal samples from calves experimentally infected with JV; the ELISA was specific only for JV. The ELISA was used to screen 381 diarrheal samples collected from dairy herds in Thuringia, Hesse, and Bavaria, Germany, from 1999 to 2002; 34 of these samples (8.9%) were positive for JV infection. The unexpectedly high prevalence of JV was confirmed in a seroepidemiological study using 824 serum or plasma samples screened using an anti-JV ELISA, which showed that 99.1% of cattle from Thuringia have antibodies to JV.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 27020
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/27020
ISSN: 0095-1137
PURE UUID: 879a948f-54d4-4daa-b3e5-442a5640b301
ORCID for I.N. Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4938-1620

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Apr 2006
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:19

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Y. Deng
Author: C.A. Batten
Author: B.L. Liu
Author: P.R. Lambden
Author: M. Elschner
Author: H. Gunther
Author: P. Otto
Author: P. Schnurch
Author: W. Eichhorn
Author: W. Herbst
Author: I.N. Clarke ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×