The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Biologically inspired analogue signal processing: some results towards developing next generation signal analyzers

Maharatna, K., Ahmadi, A. and Magieri, E. (2009) Biologically inspired analogue signal processing: some results towards developing next generation signal analyzers 2009 12th International Symposium on Integrated Circuits (ISIC 2009), pp. 542-5.

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this work we describe the possibility of designing an analogue signal analyzer taking inspiration from biological and chemical information processing methodology present in the nature. The principal component of such a system is an adaptive-frequency Hopf oscillator. Using the proposed methodology it is possible to carry out Fourier as well as time-frequency analysis of a signal (similar to wavelet analysis) without changing the underlying circuit structure. This work may provide a route to a computationally superior and less power consuming next-generation signal processing system. Some open issues for making such an approach to practice are also discussed.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2009
Additional Information: Imported from ISI Web of Science
Organisations: Electronic & Software Systems

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 270590
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/270590
PURE UUID: 44c44d30-4f19-4879-8eb3-1ff8edb6b0b8

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Apr 2010 07:46
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:51

Export record

Contributors

Author: K. Maharatna
Author: A. Ahmadi
Author: E. Magieri

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×