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Toward subtle intimate interfaces for mobile devices using an EMG controller

Toward subtle intimate interfaces for mobile devices using an EMG controller
Toward subtle intimate interfaces for mobile devices using an EMG controller
Using a mobile device in a social context should not cause embarrassment and disruption to the immediate environment. Interaction with mobile and wearable devices needs to be subtle, discreet and unobtrusive. Therefore, we promote the idea of "intimate interfaces": discrete interfaces that allow control of mobile devices through subtle gestures in order to gain social acceptance. To achieve this goal, we present an electromyogram (EMG) based wearable input device which recognizes isometric muscular activity: activity related to very subtle or no movement at all. In the online experiment reported, the EMG device, worn on an armband around the bicep, was able to reliably recognize a motionless gesture without calibration or training across users with different muscle volumes. Hence, EMG-based input devices can provide an effective solution for designing mobile interfaces that are subtle and intimate, and therefore socially acceptable.
481-489
Costanza, Enrico
0868f119-c42e-4b5f-905f-fe98c1beeded
Inverso, Samuel A.
ba6765de-de29-4170-bde5-8cbb984605f5
Allen, Rebecca
938ff773-22ef-40fb-b0a2-0a544257d041
Costanza, Enrico
0868f119-c42e-4b5f-905f-fe98c1beeded
Inverso, Samuel A.
ba6765de-de29-4170-bde5-8cbb984605f5
Allen, Rebecca
938ff773-22ef-40fb-b0a2-0a544257d041

Costanza, Enrico, Inverso, Samuel A. and Allen, Rebecca (2005) Toward subtle intimate interfaces for mobile devices using an EMG controller. At CHI '05: Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems CHI '05: Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems. pp. 481-489.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Using a mobile device in a social context should not cause embarrassment and disruption to the immediate environment. Interaction with mobile and wearable devices needs to be subtle, discreet and unobtrusive. Therefore, we promote the idea of "intimate interfaces": discrete interfaces that allow control of mobile devices through subtle gestures in order to gain social acceptance. To achieve this goal, we present an electromyogram (EMG) based wearable input device which recognizes isometric muscular activity: activity related to very subtle or no movement at all. In the online experiment reported, the EMG device, worn on an armband around the bicep, was able to reliably recognize a motionless gesture without calibration or training across users with different muscle volumes. Hence, EMG-based input devices can provide an effective solution for designing mobile interfaces that are subtle and intimate, and therefore socially acceptable.

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Published date: 2005
Venue - Dates: CHI '05: Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems, 2005-01-01
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 270956
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/270956
PURE UUID: aeb8e881-630d-4a09-a3b0-abc63ab64976

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Apr 2010 16:05
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:49

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Contributors

Author: Enrico Costanza
Author: Samuel A. Inverso
Author: Rebecca Allen

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