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A Mechanism for the Formation of Copper Sulphide in Oil Filled Electrical Equipment

A Mechanism for the Formation of Copper Sulphide in Oil Filled Electrical Equipment
A Mechanism for the Formation of Copper Sulphide in Oil Filled Electrical Equipment
The formation of copper sulphide within oil filled high voltage electrical equipment can lead to the failure of the equipment. Incidents involving large transformers have been attributed to such contamination. Sealed equipment, working under high loads and containing mineral oil with high sulphur content, appear to be most at risk. The failure is caused by copper sulphide deposits which produce a low resistance path across and through the cellulose insulation and can lead to internal discharge and flash-over. However, the mechanism for how and why the copper sulphide forms on copper is largely an open question. A simple heating test, using strip copper, is available which indicates the likelihood of copper sulphide formation when using a mineral oil type. This paper outlines a series of experiments using variations to this heating test. The results suggest a mechanism for how copper sulphide forms on the copper itself.
978-1-4244-6300-8
CD-ROM
Mitchinson, P M
9de2f4d4-38fb-466b-94c6-c4390a6b2aa8
Lewin, P L
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Jarman, P
390aafbd-393e-4e20-bace-b4416e0dd456
Mitchinson, P M
9de2f4d4-38fb-466b-94c6-c4390a6b2aa8
Lewin, P L
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Jarman, P
390aafbd-393e-4e20-bace-b4416e0dd456

Mitchinson, P M, Lewin, P L and Jarman, P (2010) A Mechanism for the Formation of Copper Sulphide in Oil Filled Electrical Equipment. IEEE 2010 International Symposium on Electrical Insulation, San Diego, California, United States. 05 - 08 Jun 2010. CD-ROM .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The formation of copper sulphide within oil filled high voltage electrical equipment can lead to the failure of the equipment. Incidents involving large transformers have been attributed to such contamination. Sealed equipment, working under high loads and containing mineral oil with high sulphur content, appear to be most at risk. The failure is caused by copper sulphide deposits which produce a low resistance path across and through the cellulose insulation and can lead to internal discharge and flash-over. However, the mechanism for how and why the copper sulphide forms on copper is largely an open question. A simple heating test, using strip copper, is available which indicates the likelihood of copper sulphide formation when using a mineral oil type. This paper outlines a series of experiments using variations to this heating test. The results suggest a mechanism for how copper sulphide forms on the copper itself.

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More information

Published date: 6 June 2010
Additional Information: Event Dates: 6 - 9 June 2010
Venue - Dates: IEEE 2010 International Symposium on Electrical Insulation, San Diego, California, United States, 2010-06-05 - 2010-06-08
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 271227
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/271227
ISBN: 978-1-4244-6300-8
PURE UUID: 8d7b280c-9b7c-4271-a1ad-63bfee7ce7dc

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jun 2010 20:12
Last modified: 20 Nov 2021 10:22

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Contributors

Author: P M Mitchinson
Author: P L Lewin
Author: P Jarman

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