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A novel binary particle fractionation technique

A novel binary particle fractionation technique
A novel binary particle fractionation technique
An interesting development towards a robust particle fractionator is presented. Typically acoustic fractionators rely on time of flight in a constant acoustic field to separate different populations . Such a system requires all particles to be concentrated to an initial known point before entering the acoustic field. As the particle population enters the acoustic field, the particles will move towards the nodal point at velocities dictated by their relative size. If the size of the acoustic chamber, flow rates and radiation forces are carefully adjusted, particles can be graded across the width of the chamber when they exit the acoustic field. In this work we describe a technique that allows a more robust fractionation technique which is less sensitive to residence time and allows particle populations to be split in a binary fashion. Modelling results and initial experimental results are presented.
Ultrasonic separation
277 - 281
Harris, Nick
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Boltryk, Rosemary
cf449695-2791-4ee6-a38d-58abfdaa8233
Glynne-Jones, Peter
34de01be-0c47-4f1a-a442-17323a7a846d
Hill, Martyn
d65df777-edc9-47f3-9a7d-7593e5ac5d90
Harris, Nick
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Boltryk, Rosemary
cf449695-2791-4ee6-a38d-58abfdaa8233
Glynne-Jones, Peter
34de01be-0c47-4f1a-a442-17323a7a846d
Hill, Martyn
d65df777-edc9-47f3-9a7d-7593e5ac5d90

Harris, Nick, Boltryk, Rosemary, Glynne-Jones, Peter and Hill, Martyn (2010) A novel binary particle fractionation technique. Physics Procedia, 3 (1), 277 - 281.

Record type: Article

Abstract

An interesting development towards a robust particle fractionator is presented. Typically acoustic fractionators rely on time of flight in a constant acoustic field to separate different populations . Such a system requires all particles to be concentrated to an initial known point before entering the acoustic field. As the particle population enters the acoustic field, the particles will move towards the nodal point at velocities dictated by their relative size. If the size of the acoustic chamber, flow rates and radiation forces are carefully adjusted, particles can be graded across the width of the chamber when they exit the acoustic field. In this work we describe a technique that allows a more robust fractionation technique which is less sensitive to residence time and allows particle populations to be split in a binary fashion. Modelling results and initial experimental results are presented.

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More information

Published date: 2010
Additional Information: International Congress on Ultrasonics, Santiago de Chile, January 2009
Keywords: Ultrasonic separation
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 271429
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/271429
PURE UUID: 48ca09ce-d7d2-429b-bd63-43342ae85208
ORCID for Nick Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4122-2219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Jul 2010 11:26
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 02:00

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