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Kinetic energy harvesting

Kinetic energy harvesting
Kinetic energy harvesting
This chapter introduces principles of normal kinetic energy harvesting and adaptive kinetic energy harvesting. Kinetic energy harvesters, also known as vibration power generators, are typically, although not exclusively, inertial spring-mass systems. Electrical power is extracted by employing one or a combination of different transduction mechanisms. Main transduction mechanisms are piezoelectric, electromagnetic and electrostatic. As most vibration power generators are resonant systems, they generate maximum power when the resonant frequency of the generator matches ambient vibration frequency. Any difference between these two frequencies can result in a significant decrease in generated power. Recent development in adaptive kinetic energy harvesting increases the operating frequency range of such generators. Possible solutions include tuning resonant frequency of the generator and widening the bandwidth of the generator. In this chapter, principles and operating strategies for adaptive kinetic energy harvesters will be presented and compared.
978-1-4419-7565-2
1-78
Springer
Zhu, Dibin
ec52eae1-39fa-427c-968b-e76089a464a6
Beeby, Steve
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Kazmierski, Tom
Beeby, Steve
Zhu, Dibin
ec52eae1-39fa-427c-968b-e76089a464a6
Beeby, Steve
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Kazmierski, Tom
Beeby, Steve

Zhu, Dibin and Beeby, Steve (2011) Kinetic energy harvesting. In, Kazmierski, Tom and Beeby, Steve (eds.) Energy Harvesting Systems: Principles, Modeling and Applications. Springer, pp. 1-78. ,

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This chapter introduces principles of normal kinetic energy harvesting and adaptive kinetic energy harvesting. Kinetic energy harvesters, also known as vibration power generators, are typically, although not exclusively, inertial spring-mass systems. Electrical power is extracted by employing one or a combination of different transduction mechanisms. Main transduction mechanisms are piezoelectric, electromagnetic and electrostatic. As most vibration power generators are resonant systems, they generate maximum power when the resonant frequency of the generator matches ambient vibration frequency. Any difference between these two frequencies can result in a significant decrease in generated power. Recent development in adaptive kinetic energy harvesting increases the operating frequency range of such generators. Possible solutions include tuning resonant frequency of the generator and widening the bandwidth of the generator. In this chapter, principles and operating strategies for adaptive kinetic energy harvesters will be presented and compared.

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More information

Published date: 2011
Additional Information: Chapter: 1
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 271971
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/271971
ISBN: 978-1-4419-7565-2
PURE UUID: fb8fabb3-cfc1-4ac4-ae08-9f06b2f4c272
ORCID for Steve Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Feb 2011 14:57
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:07

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