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Magnetic levitation of large liquid volume

Magnetic levitation of large liquid volume
Magnetic levitation of large liquid volume
It is well known from experiments and industrial applications of cold crucible melting that an intense AC magnetic field can be used to levitate large volumes of liquid metal in the terrestrial conditions. The levitation confinement mechanism for large volumes of fluid is considerably different from the case of a small droplet, where surface tension plays a key role in constraining the liquid outflow at the critical bottom point. The dynamic interaction between the oscillatory motion of the free surface and the effects of turbulent flow is analysed using a unified numerical model, which describes the time dependent behaviour of the liquid metal and the magnetic field. The MHD modified k-? turbulence model is used to describe the mixing and damping properties at smaller scales not resolved by the macro model. The numerical multiphysics simulations suggest that it is possible to levitate a few kilograms of liquid metal in a cold crucible without requiring mechanical support from the container walls. Possible applications to the processing of reactive metals are discussed.
Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), Magnetic Levitation, Eddy currents, solenoid
317-329
Bojarevics, Valdis
1fc203a6-526f-478d-b26f-4da4474c06db
Roy, Alan A
023648ec-2915-4a04-abdf-38e200a5308a
Pericleous, Koulis
3271e1e8-f831-400c-824f-7f14f46e51c9
Bojarevics, Valdis
1fc203a6-526f-478d-b26f-4da4474c06db
Roy, Alan A
023648ec-2915-4a04-abdf-38e200a5308a
Pericleous, Koulis
3271e1e8-f831-400c-824f-7f14f46e51c9

Bojarevics, Valdis, Roy, Alan A and Pericleous, Koulis (2010) Magnetic levitation of large liquid volume. Magnetohydrodynamics, 46 (4), 317-329.

Record type: Article

Abstract

It is well known from experiments and industrial applications of cold crucible melting that an intense AC magnetic field can be used to levitate large volumes of liquid metal in the terrestrial conditions. The levitation confinement mechanism for large volumes of fluid is considerably different from the case of a small droplet, where surface tension plays a key role in constraining the liquid outflow at the critical bottom point. The dynamic interaction between the oscillatory motion of the free surface and the effects of turbulent flow is analysed using a unified numerical model, which describes the time dependent behaviour of the liquid metal and the magnetic field. The MHD modified k-? turbulence model is used to describe the mixing and damping properties at smaller scales not resolved by the macro model. The numerical multiphysics simulations suggest that it is possible to levitate a few kilograms of liquid metal in a cold crucible without requiring mechanical support from the container walls. Possible applications to the processing of reactive metals are discussed.

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Published date: 2010
Keywords: Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), Magnetic Levitation, Eddy currents, solenoid
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 272089
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/272089
PURE UUID: 5402252e-41a8-42e6-86a4-29ae1c30e883

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Date deposited: 08 Mar 2011 11:13
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 22:10

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Contributors

Author: Valdis Bojarevics
Author: Alan A Roy
Author: Koulis Pericleous

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