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An investigation of the potential of polypropylene and its blends for use in recyclable high voltage cable insulation systems

An investigation of the potential of polypropylene and its blends for use in recyclable high voltage cable insulation systems
An investigation of the potential of polypropylene and its blends for use in recyclable high voltage cable insulation systems
Most modern extruded high voltage cables employ cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) as the insulation material. XLPE has excellent thermo-mechanical properties, is relatively cheap and has a low dielectric loss, which make it an ideal material for this application. Unfortunately, XLPE is not easily recycled at the end of its lifetime leading to questions concerning its long-term sustainability. A previous investigation in this series considered the potential of a range of ethylene-based systems to provide suitable recyclable alternatives to XLPE. Whilst blending could allow systems having similar thermo-mechanical and electrical properties to XLPE to be designed, it was not possible to obtain better performance than XLPE using these systems. Polypropylene offers, potentially, a route to improved insulation systems by virtue of its higher melting point and excellent dielectric properties. However, traditional isotactic polypropylenes have always had the problem of being too brittle for inclusion into practical cable designs. Recently a broad range of propylene co-polymers having improved ductility have become available, which may prove more suitable. The current study compares traditional isotactic and syndiotactic polypropylenes to a range of commercially available propylene co-polymers and focuses on their morphology, thermal, thermo-mechanical and electrical properties. These parameters were then taken together to identify the most suitable candidate materials for future cable applications. The use of blending as a means to further optimise the various material properties was also explored
0022-2461
4058-4070
Hosier, Ian L.
6a44329e-b742-44de-afa7-073f80a78e26
Vaughan, Alun S.
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3
Swingler, Steven G.
4f13fbb2-7d2e-480a-8687-acea6a4ed735
Hosier, Ian L.
6a44329e-b742-44de-afa7-073f80a78e26
Vaughan, Alun S.
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3
Swingler, Steven G.
4f13fbb2-7d2e-480a-8687-acea6a4ed735

Hosier, Ian L., Vaughan, Alun S. and Swingler, Steven G. (2011) An investigation of the potential of polypropylene and its blends for use in recyclable high voltage cable insulation systems. Journal of Materials Science, 46 (11), 4058-4070. (doi:10.1007/s10853-011-5335-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Most modern extruded high voltage cables employ cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) as the insulation material. XLPE has excellent thermo-mechanical properties, is relatively cheap and has a low dielectric loss, which make it an ideal material for this application. Unfortunately, XLPE is not easily recycled at the end of its lifetime leading to questions concerning its long-term sustainability. A previous investigation in this series considered the potential of a range of ethylene-based systems to provide suitable recyclable alternatives to XLPE. Whilst blending could allow systems having similar thermo-mechanical and electrical properties to XLPE to be designed, it was not possible to obtain better performance than XLPE using these systems. Polypropylene offers, potentially, a route to improved insulation systems by virtue of its higher melting point and excellent dielectric properties. However, traditional isotactic polypropylenes have always had the problem of being too brittle for inclusion into practical cable designs. Recently a broad range of propylene co-polymers having improved ductility have become available, which may prove more suitable. The current study compares traditional isotactic and syndiotactic polypropylenes to a range of commercially available propylene co-polymers and focuses on their morphology, thermal, thermo-mechanical and electrical properties. These parameters were then taken together to identify the most suitable candidate materials for future cable applications. The use of blending as a means to further optimise the various material properties was also explored

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Published date: 2011
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 272105
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/272105
ISSN: 0022-2461
PURE UUID: a02abcd6-77c2-4fb3-8cd7-e1c5883093ee
ORCID for Ian L. Hosier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4365-9385
ORCID for Alun S. Vaughan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0535-513X

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Date deposited: 17 Mar 2011 09:35
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Ian L. Hosier ORCID iD
Author: Alun S. Vaughan ORCID iD
Author: Steven G. Swingler

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