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Fault-Tolerant Techniques to Minimize the Impact of Crosstalk on Phase Encoded Communication Channels

Fault-Tolerant Techniques to Minimize the Impact of Crosstalk on Phase Encoded Communication Channels
Fault-Tolerant Techniques to Minimize the Impact of Crosstalk on Phase Encoded Communication Channels
An on-chip intermodule self-timed communication system is considered in which symbols are encoded by means of phase difference between transitions of signals on parallel wires. The reliability of such a channel is governed and significantly lowered by capacitive crosstalk effects between adjacent wires. A more robust high-speed phase-encoded channel can be designed by minimizing its vulnerability to crosstalk noise. This paper investigates the impact of crosstalk on phase-encoded transmission channels. A functional fault model is presented to characterize the problem. Two fault-tolerant schemes are introduced which are based on information redundancy techniques and a partial-order coding concept. The area overheads, performance, and fault-tolerant capability of those methods are compared. It is shown that a substantial improvement in the performance can be obtained for four-wire channels when using the fault-tolerant design approach, at the expense of 25 percent of information capacity per symbol.
978-1-59593-918-0
Halak, Basel
8221f839-0dfd-4f81-9865-37def5f79f33
Yakovlev, Alex
d6c94911-c126-4cb7-8f92-d71a898ebbb2
Halak, Basel
8221f839-0dfd-4f81-9865-37def5f79f33
Yakovlev, Alex
d6c94911-c126-4cb7-8f92-d71a898ebbb2

Halak, Basel and Yakovlev, Alex (2008) Fault-Tolerant Techniques to Minimize the Impact of Crosstalk on Phase Encoded Communication Channels IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS, VOL. 57, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 505

Record type: Article

Abstract

An on-chip intermodule self-timed communication system is considered in which symbols are encoded by means of phase difference between transitions of signals on parallel wires. The reliability of such a channel is governed and significantly lowered by capacitive crosstalk effects between adjacent wires. A more robust high-speed phase-encoded channel can be designed by minimizing its vulnerability to crosstalk noise. This paper investigates the impact of crosstalk on phase-encoded transmission channels. A functional fault model is presented to characterize the problem. Two fault-tolerant schemes are introduced which are based on information redundancy techniques and a partial-order coding concept. The area overheads, performance, and fault-tolerant capability of those methods are compared. It is shown that a substantial improvement in the performance can be obtained for four-wire channels when using the fault-tolerant design approach, at the expense of 25 percent of information capacity per symbol.

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Published date: 1 April 2008
Venue - Dates: Design, Automation and Test in Europe, 2008. DATE '08, 2008-04-01
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 272155
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/272155
ISBN: 978-1-59593-918-0
PURE UUID: 8ddcc551-8e91-4428-9274-595e333033db

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Date deposited: 06 Apr 2011 11:55
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:33

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Contributors

Author: Basel Halak
Author: Alex Yakovlev

University divisions

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