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3D stroke rehabilitation using electrical stimulation and robotics

3D stroke rehabilitation using electrical stimulation and robotics
3D stroke rehabilitation using electrical stimulation and robotics
Stroke is the third leading cause of death and foremost cause of adult disability in the UK. A third of the surviving patients suffer from some degree of motor disability and depend on others to undertake daily activities. Conventional rehabilitation can mitigate this disability, but only 5% of the severely paralysed patients regain full upper limb function. Past studies have shown evidence of more effective technologies such as rehabilitation robotics and functional electrical stimulation (FES). Previous collaborative research at the University of Southampton developed a system that pioneered the use of FES with rehabilitation robots to assist planar upper limb stroke rehabilitation. Results from a clinical trial in 2008 have shown significant improvements in 5 stroke patients across a range of clinical outcome measures. Stimulation Assistance through iterative learning (SAIL) is a novel system that builds on this work, combining robotic therapy with the use of FES. This research has been possible through collaboration between engineers, physiotherapists and psychologists. The SAIL platform assists patients in performing 3D arm movements that are presented in a virtual reality setting and resemble daily activities. This assistance is provided through a supportive robotic system, together with FES applied to two muscles in the arm. Iterative learning control (ILC) schemes have been designed for the delivery of precisely-controlled FES to maximise the therapeutic effect of training. Preliminary tests with 9 unimpaired patients and 2 stroke patients have confirmed the control system’s high level of performance in assisting movement. These encouraging results are expected to transfer into effective treatment on 5 stroke patients who have recently started a clinical trial comprising 18 treatment sessions. A range of clinical measures are employed to assess the performance of patients pre- and post-treatment. In addition to the assessment of motor function, the Behavioural Inattention Test is being used to assess level and changes in visual neglect.
Tong, Daisy
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Cai, Zhonglun
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Meadmore, Katie
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Hughes, Anne-Marie
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Freeman, Christopher
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Burridge, Jane
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Rogers, E
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Tong, Daisy
a956f1fa-832c-405e-ac5a-8b8aca6e1ea0
Cai, Zhonglun
dd8dd525-19a5-4792-a048-617340996afe
Meadmore, Katie
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Hughes, Anne-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Burridge, Jane
7c453775-c3ae-4d55-99af-2ed8600ca680
Rogers, E
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Tong, Daisy, Cai, Zhonglun, Meadmore, Katie, Hughes, Anne-Marie, Freeman, Christopher, Burridge, Jane and Rogers, E (2011) 3D stroke rehabilitation using electrical stimulation and robotics. Multidisciplinary Postgraduate Research Showcase.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and foremost cause of adult disability in the UK. A third of the surviving patients suffer from some degree of motor disability and depend on others to undertake daily activities. Conventional rehabilitation can mitigate this disability, but only 5% of the severely paralysed patients regain full upper limb function. Past studies have shown evidence of more effective technologies such as rehabilitation robotics and functional electrical stimulation (FES). Previous collaborative research at the University of Southampton developed a system that pioneered the use of FES with rehabilitation robots to assist planar upper limb stroke rehabilitation. Results from a clinical trial in 2008 have shown significant improvements in 5 stroke patients across a range of clinical outcome measures. Stimulation Assistance through iterative learning (SAIL) is a novel system that builds on this work, combining robotic therapy with the use of FES. This research has been possible through collaboration between engineers, physiotherapists and psychologists. The SAIL platform assists patients in performing 3D arm movements that are presented in a virtual reality setting and resemble daily activities. This assistance is provided through a supportive robotic system, together with FES applied to two muscles in the arm. Iterative learning control (ILC) schemes have been designed for the delivery of precisely-controlled FES to maximise the therapeutic effect of training. Preliminary tests with 9 unimpaired patients and 2 stroke patients have confirmed the control system’s high level of performance in assisting movement. These encouraging results are expected to transfer into effective treatment on 5 stroke patients who have recently started a clinical trial comprising 18 treatment sessions. A range of clinical measures are employed to assess the performance of patients pre- and post-treatment. In addition to the assessment of motor function, the Behavioural Inattention Test is being used to assess level and changes in visual neglect.

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More information

Published date: 31 March 2011
Venue - Dates: Multidisciplinary Postgraduate Research Showcase, 2011-03-30
Organisations: EEE, Southampton Wireless Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 272174
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/272174
PURE UUID: 86e53928-aabd-4b25-b521-e33263d171ef
ORCID for Katie Meadmore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5378-8370
ORCID for Anne-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for E Rogers: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0179-9398

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Apr 2011 08:40
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:03

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Contributors

Author: Daisy Tong
Author: Zhonglun Cai
Author: Katie Meadmore ORCID iD
Author: Christopher Freeman
Author: Jane Burridge
Author: E Rogers ORCID iD

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