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Human-powered inertial energy harvesters: the effect of orientation, location and activity on obtainable power

Human-powered inertial energy harvesters: the effect of orientation, location and activity on obtainable power
Human-powered inertial energy harvesters: the effect of orientation, location and activity on obtainable power
Inertial energy harvesting is an emerging technology that can power electronic devices using energy scavenged from the motion of the human body. Owing to the relatively low frequencies associated with body motion (<3 Hz), the generated electrical power is typically in the range of a few µW; hence transduction must be optimized. Previous studies have investigated the effect of activity and harvester location on the obtained power; this work evaluates how power is also affected by the harvester’s orientation. Ten participants performed walking and running exercises, while tri-axial acceleration data were sampled at five locations on the body. The results show consistency in the optimal orientation of the harvester between people, but this orientation is not aligned with the axes of the body and limbs. During walking, the power harvested from the upper and lower body differs by an order of magnitude; however, this difference is less significant when running.
Huang, Hui
ae101bbc-d3d7-4bbd-a3ac-55ee4c0f8118
Merrett, Geoff
89b3a696-41de-44c3-89aa-b0aa29f54020
White, Neil
c7be4c26-e419-4e5c-9420-09fc02e2ac9c
Huang, Hui
ae101bbc-d3d7-4bbd-a3ac-55ee4c0f8118
Merrett, Geoff
89b3a696-41de-44c3-89aa-b0aa29f54020
White, Neil
c7be4c26-e419-4e5c-9420-09fc02e2ac9c

Huang, Hui, Merrett, Geoff and White, Neil (2011) Human-powered inertial energy harvesters: the effect of orientation, location and activity on obtainable power At Eurosensors XXV, Greece. 04 - 07 Sep 2011.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Inertial energy harvesting is an emerging technology that can power electronic devices using energy scavenged from the motion of the human body. Owing to the relatively low frequencies associated with body motion (<3 Hz), the generated electrical power is typically in the range of a few µW; hence transduction must be optimized. Previous studies have investigated the effect of activity and harvester location on the obtained power; this work evaluates how power is also affected by the harvester’s orientation. Ten participants performed walking and running exercises, while tri-axial acceleration data were sampled at five locations on the body. The results show consistency in the optimal orientation of the harvester between people, but this orientation is not aligned with the axes of the body and limbs. During walking, the power harvested from the upper and lower body differs by an order of magnitude; however, this difference is less significant when running.

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More information

Published date: September 2011
Additional Information: Event Dates: 4-7 September 2011
Venue - Dates: Eurosensors XXV, Greece, 2011-09-04 - 2011-09-07
Organisations: Electronic & Software Systems, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 272410
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/272410
PURE UUID: 8d066701-36ba-4600-b39d-1f8a73394e28
ORCID for Geoff Merrett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4980-3894
ORCID for Neil White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1532-6452

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jun 2011 12:08
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:24

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Contributors

Author: Hui Huang
Author: Geoff Merrett ORCID iD
Author: Neil White ORCID iD

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