The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Patterns of Eye Movements during Cancellation Tasks in Stroke Patients Exhibiting Hemispatial Neglect

Patterns of Eye Movements during Cancellation Tasks in Stroke Patients Exhibiting Hemispatial Neglect
Patterns of Eye Movements during Cancellation Tasks in Stroke Patients Exhibiting Hemispatial Neglect
To investigate whether hemispatial neglect arises due to an information sampling deficit or impaired processing of information on the left we measured eye movements of stroke patients whilst they completed a sub-set of the Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT; Wilson et al., 1987, Behavioural Inattention Test. Suffolk, UK: Thames Valley Test Company) over three sessions. Participants who initially demonstrated left neglect in star and letter cancellation tasks exhibited a marked sampling deficit, with fewer visits made and less total time spent on the far left region of the stimulus. In the later testing sessions, a different pattern of eye movements emerged, with compensatory eye movements being made. The amount of time spent on the left increased and gaze durations were longer in the far left region compared with the other regions. This suggests that, although participants over time could sample information from the neglected region, the acquisition and processing of that information was impaired. Furthermore, behavioural measures (from the letter cancellation task) showed that, despite fixations on the left of the stimulus in the later testing sessions, neglect was still present, indicating a processing deficit. Overall, these results demonstrate neglect can arise due to both information sampling and information processing deficits.
Leyland, Louise-Ann Leyland
9dfb7b2b-0f2f-4181-9ff6-d5d1cd7f02e1
Meadmore, Katie L.
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Godwin, Hayward J.
ee1acd0b-58ee-457f-a49d-20eda38f01f9
Benson, Valerie
727f7fea-7f03-4caf-b1f1-7ac3621322d3
Burridge, Jane H.
c3ae207c-24bf-4f62-a195-4255211a2bfb
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72
Liversedge, Simon P.
0c5b3123-0725-4da7-9ab0-27ab95b73fa1
Leyland, Louise-Ann Leyland
9dfb7b2b-0f2f-4181-9ff6-d5d1cd7f02e1
Meadmore, Katie L.
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Godwin, Hayward J.
ee1acd0b-58ee-457f-a49d-20eda38f01f9
Benson, Valerie
727f7fea-7f03-4caf-b1f1-7ac3621322d3
Burridge, Jane H.
c3ae207c-24bf-4f62-a195-4255211a2bfb
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72
Liversedge, Simon P.
0c5b3123-0725-4da7-9ab0-27ab95b73fa1

(2011) Patterns of Eye Movements during Cancellation Tasks in Stroke Patients Exhibiting Hemispatial Neglect. European Conference on Eye Movements, France. (Submitted)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

To investigate whether hemispatial neglect arises due to an information sampling deficit or impaired processing of information on the left we measured eye movements of stroke patients whilst they completed a sub-set of the Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT; Wilson et al., 1987, Behavioural Inattention Test. Suffolk, UK: Thames Valley Test Company) over three sessions. Participants who initially demonstrated left neglect in star and letter cancellation tasks exhibited a marked sampling deficit, with fewer visits made and less total time spent on the far left region of the stimulus. In the later testing sessions, a different pattern of eye movements emerged, with compensatory eye movements being made. The amount of time spent on the left increased and gaze durations were longer in the far left region compared with the other regions. This suggests that, although participants over time could sample information from the neglected region, the acquisition and processing of that information was impaired. Furthermore, behavioural measures (from the letter cancellation task) showed that, despite fixations on the left of the stimulus in the later testing sessions, neglect was still present, indicating a processing deficit. Overall, these results demonstrate neglect can arise due to both information sampling and information processing deficits.

Other
ECEM_2011_Abstract__Final.docx - Other
Restricted to Registered users only
Download (19kB)
Request a copy

More information

Submitted date: 2011
Additional Information: Event Dates: August 2011
Venue - Dates: European Conference on Eye Movements, France, 2011-08-01
Organisations: EEE, Southampton Wireless Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 272594
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/272594
PURE UUID: 6f1746d8-5ec8-47da-829a-8666f8d9de89
ORCID for Katie L. Meadmore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5378-8370
ORCID for Ann-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for Eric Rogers: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0179-9398

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jul 2011 16:16
Last modified: 14 Jun 2019 00:40

Export record

Contributors

Author: Louise-Ann Leyland Leyland
Author: Hayward J. Godwin
Author: Valerie Benson
Author: Jane H. Burridge
Author: Christopher Freeman
Author: Eric Rogers ORCID iD
Author: Simon P. Liversedge

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×