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ILC mediated FES for stroke arm rehabilitation

ILC mediated FES for stroke arm rehabilitation
ILC mediated FES for stroke arm rehabilitation
Background: Evidence exists for the effectiveness of functional electrical stimulation (FES) and robots in stroke rehabilitation. This study examined i) the feasibility of using Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning (SAIL), a novel system combining FES and robots for chronic stroke upper limb rehabilitation and ii) participants’ perspectives of the system. Method: Five chronic stroke participants, three men and two women aged between 33 and 67 years, with reduced upper limb function were recruited to this study via stroke clubs and a volunteer database. Participants undertook 18, 1 hour training sessions involving 3D tracking tasks in which they moved their impaired arm, supported by a robot, to follow a slowly moving sphere along a specified trajectory. FES precisely controlled by advanced iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms, was applied to the triceps and anterior deltoid muscles. Participants also completed unassisted tracking tasks in each session, and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment (F-M) pre- and post-intervention. Participant perspectives were explored during a semi-structured interview post-intervention. Analysis of data was conducted using: linear regression for changes in assisted and unassisted tracking; a signed Wilcoxon sum-rank test for F-M and ARAT; and content analysis for the semi-structured interviews. Results: From pre- to post-intervention a significant improvement in the F-M (mean 23.5 (SD 12.95) to 32.8 (SD 12.28), z(5) = -2.02, p = .04), an improvement in unassisted tracking performance, and a reduction in the amount of ES required for accurate assisted tracking were demonstrated. No changes were found for the ARAT. Participants responded positively to the system and identified ways to achieve more effective, functional improvements. Conclusion: The feasibility of SAIL in reducing upper limb impairments following stroke was demonstrated. Participants’ perspectives highlighted key issues to be considered by researchers developing new rehabilitation technologies, indicating the value of user involvement.
Hughes, Anne-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Meadmore, Katie
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Benson, Valerie
727f7fea-7f03-4caf-b1f1-7ac3621322d3
Tong, Daisy
a956f1fa-832c-405e-ac5a-8b8aca6e1ea0
Burridge, Jane
7c453775-c3ae-4d55-99af-2ed8600ca680
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72
Hughes, Anne-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Meadmore, Katie
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Benson, Valerie
727f7fea-7f03-4caf-b1f1-7ac3621322d3
Tong, Daisy
a956f1fa-832c-405e-ac5a-8b8aca6e1ea0
Burridge, Jane
7c453775-c3ae-4d55-99af-2ed8600ca680
Rogers, Eric
611b1de0-c505-472e-a03f-c5294c63bb72

Hughes, Anne-Marie, Meadmore, Katie, Freeman, Christopher, Benson, Valerie, Tong, Daisy, Burridge, Jane and Rogers, Eric (2012) ILC mediated FES for stroke arm rehabilitation. 7th World Congress for Neurorehabilitation, Melbourne, Australia. 15 - 18 May 2012.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Background: Evidence exists for the effectiveness of functional electrical stimulation (FES) and robots in stroke rehabilitation. This study examined i) the feasibility of using Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning (SAIL), a novel system combining FES and robots for chronic stroke upper limb rehabilitation and ii) participants’ perspectives of the system. Method: Five chronic stroke participants, three men and two women aged between 33 and 67 years, with reduced upper limb function were recruited to this study via stroke clubs and a volunteer database. Participants undertook 18, 1 hour training sessions involving 3D tracking tasks in which they moved their impaired arm, supported by a robot, to follow a slowly moving sphere along a specified trajectory. FES precisely controlled by advanced iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms, was applied to the triceps and anterior deltoid muscles. Participants also completed unassisted tracking tasks in each session, and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment (F-M) pre- and post-intervention. Participant perspectives were explored during a semi-structured interview post-intervention. Analysis of data was conducted using: linear regression for changes in assisted and unassisted tracking; a signed Wilcoxon sum-rank test for F-M and ARAT; and content analysis for the semi-structured interviews. Results: From pre- to post-intervention a significant improvement in the F-M (mean 23.5 (SD 12.95) to 32.8 (SD 12.28), z(5) = -2.02, p = .04), an improvement in unassisted tracking performance, and a reduction in the amount of ES required for accurate assisted tracking were demonstrated. No changes were found for the ARAT. Participants responded positively to the system and identified ways to achieve more effective, functional improvements. Conclusion: The feasibility of SAIL in reducing upper limb impairments following stroke was demonstrated. Participants’ perspectives highlighted key issues to be considered by researchers developing new rehabilitation technologies, indicating the value of user involvement.

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More information

Published date: January 2012
Additional Information: Event Dates: 16-19 May 2012
Venue - Dates: 7th World Congress for Neurorehabilitation, Melbourne, Australia, 2012-05-15 - 2012-05-18
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 273107
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/273107
PURE UUID: 629f0c47-7813-42e7-8dda-37ae6dc48a93
ORCID for Anne-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for Katie Meadmore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5378-8370
ORCID for Eric Rogers: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0179-9398

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jan 2012 15:16
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:01

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