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Development of a web-supported programme of Constraint Induced Therapy following stroke (LifeCit)

Development of a web-supported programme of Constraint Induced Therapy following stroke (LifeCit)
Development of a web-supported programme of Constraint Induced Therapy following stroke (LifeCit)
Background and Aims: Constraint Induced Therapy (CIT) is an evidence-based intensive intervention which has not been widely implemented in UK stroke rehabilitation practice. A team at the University of Southampton has developed a software system (‘LifeGuide’). LifeGuide allows researchers to create web based interventions for online healthcare support. The aim is to use LifeGuide to develop a web supported CIT system (‘LifeCIT’) for upper limb stroke rehabilitation. Method: To identify and implement the necessary components of this web-based intervention, qualitative “think aloud studies” were carried out with a purposive sample of 4 chronic stroke patients. Data was transcribed and coded, using constant comparison to extract principles for optimal intervention design. Data collection and analysis has been concurrent with intervention development, allowing immediate modification and re-testing of intervention components as potential improvements have been identified. We anticipate to recruit 12 acute stroke patients in early 2012 and their carers/therapists to take part in further ‘think aloud’ studies. Results: Two main themes were identified: usability and motivational aspects of the system. The need for explicit instructions to navigate the website emerged, as well as a system design with limited choice and self-evident navigation. Participants reported they would have been motivated to adhere to LifeCIT if it was available to them. Data analysis revealed that computer games and activities would be motivational if they had an addictive challenging nature, with a user centred approach. Conclusion: The results have led us to alter the LifeCIT system design to automatically direct users through the website rather than having user led navigation. We are currently developing computer games to include in the CIT therapy programme, which are based on the findings of this study. Future work involves conducting a randomised controlled, single blinded pilot study of the feasibility, acceptability and clinical effectiveness of this intervention.
Meagher, Claire
759ba8d7-8271-49b3-8682-ef57f5662e57
Conlon, A.
055c3d91-4b57-4394-b810-c1ca0f7b8bf2
Hughes, Anne-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Pollet, Sebastien
a3b6c348-04f6-48b0-a729-f047484c5e6e
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Burridge, Jane
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Meagher, Claire
759ba8d7-8271-49b3-8682-ef57f5662e57
Conlon, A.
055c3d91-4b57-4394-b810-c1ca0f7b8bf2
Hughes, Anne-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Pollet, Sebastien
a3b6c348-04f6-48b0-a729-f047484c5e6e
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Burridge, Jane
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64

Meagher, Claire, Conlon, A., Hughes, Anne-Marie, Pollet, Sebastien, Yardley, Lucy and Burridge, Jane (2012) Development of a web-supported programme of Constraint Induced Therapy following stroke (LifeCit). 7th World Congress for Neurorehabilitation, Melbourne, Australia. 15 - 18 May 2012.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Background and Aims: Constraint Induced Therapy (CIT) is an evidence-based intensive intervention which has not been widely implemented in UK stroke rehabilitation practice. A team at the University of Southampton has developed a software system (‘LifeGuide’). LifeGuide allows researchers to create web based interventions for online healthcare support. The aim is to use LifeGuide to develop a web supported CIT system (‘LifeCIT’) for upper limb stroke rehabilitation. Method: To identify and implement the necessary components of this web-based intervention, qualitative “think aloud studies” were carried out with a purposive sample of 4 chronic stroke patients. Data was transcribed and coded, using constant comparison to extract principles for optimal intervention design. Data collection and analysis has been concurrent with intervention development, allowing immediate modification and re-testing of intervention components as potential improvements have been identified. We anticipate to recruit 12 acute stroke patients in early 2012 and their carers/therapists to take part in further ‘think aloud’ studies. Results: Two main themes were identified: usability and motivational aspects of the system. The need for explicit instructions to navigate the website emerged, as well as a system design with limited choice and self-evident navigation. Participants reported they would have been motivated to adhere to LifeCIT if it was available to them. Data analysis revealed that computer games and activities would be motivational if they had an addictive challenging nature, with a user centred approach. Conclusion: The results have led us to alter the LifeCIT system design to automatically direct users through the website rather than having user led navigation. We are currently developing computer games to include in the CIT therapy programme, which are based on the findings of this study. Future work involves conducting a randomised controlled, single blinded pilot study of the feasibility, acceptability and clinical effectiveness of this intervention.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: January 2012
Venue - Dates: 7th World Congress for Neurorehabilitation, Melbourne, Australia, 2012-05-15 - 2012-05-18
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Electronics & Computer Science, Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 273110
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/273110
PURE UUID: 17de1bbf-6bac-4430-9d00-0feb311f7099
ORCID for Anne-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for Sebastien Pollet: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9924-9225
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X
ORCID for Jane Burridge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3497-6725

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jan 2012 15:37
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:06

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