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Two Dimensional Numerical Model to Predict the Thermal-Chemical Degradation of a piece of Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) due to Laser Ablation

Two Dimensional Numerical Model to Predict the Thermal-Chemical Degradation of a piece of Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) due to Laser Ablation
Two Dimensional Numerical Model to Predict the Thermal-Chemical Degradation of a piece of Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) due to Laser Ablation
There is a growing interest in using carbon fibre composites (CFC) as a high tech construction material. The reason for this is that CFCs have similar mechanical performance to that of the more traditionally used materials like aluminium alloys, whilst being considerable lighter. The benefits of using a lighter material are vast. However whilst CFC have similar structural properties to that of aluminium its electrical and thermal properties are very different. This becomes important if CFCs are placed in an environment where the pieces of CFC could be struck by lightning as this interaction will damage the panels [1]. Previous studies published by N. Jennings and C. J. Hardwick [2] and F Lago et. al. [3] have attempted to model the damage caused to a piece of CFC due to a lightning strike. However these models have only considered very simple degradation methods and also did not include gas transport. The study presented here is an expansion of what has been discussed previously [4]. A two dimensional numerical model has been built which is designed to predict the damaged caused to a piece of CFC due to a lightning strike. Initial verification of the model is conducted by decoupling the thermal physics from the electrical effects and damaging the pieces of CFC by using laser ablation. The two dimensional numerical model (2D) includes thermal chemical degradation of the polymer via pyrolysis, the resultant gas transport through the decomposing material and carbon fibre vaporisation. An image of the x-ray tomography results of the laser ablated CFC samples are shown in figure 1. The predictions from the 2D model provide a reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Although further expansion of the model, into three dimensions, is required before a true validation of the numerical predictions can be achieved.
37
Chippendale, R
754f4bb5-5ade-4cc8-9de2-2e6c12b6e333
Golosnoy, I O
40603f91-7488-49ea-830f-24dd930573d1
Lewin, P L
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Chippendale, R
754f4bb5-5ade-4cc8-9de2-2e6c12b6e333
Golosnoy, I O
40603f91-7488-49ea-830f-24dd930573d1
Lewin, P L
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e

Chippendale, R, Golosnoy, I O and Lewin, P L (2012) Two Dimensional Numerical Model to Predict the Thermal-Chemical Degradation of a piece of Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) due to Laser Ablation. The Fifth UHVnet Colloquium, United Kingdom. 18 - 19 Jan 2012. p. 37 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

There is a growing interest in using carbon fibre composites (CFC) as a high tech construction material. The reason for this is that CFCs have similar mechanical performance to that of the more traditionally used materials like aluminium alloys, whilst being considerable lighter. The benefits of using a lighter material are vast. However whilst CFC have similar structural properties to that of aluminium its electrical and thermal properties are very different. This becomes important if CFCs are placed in an environment where the pieces of CFC could be struck by lightning as this interaction will damage the panels [1]. Previous studies published by N. Jennings and C. J. Hardwick [2] and F Lago et. al. [3] have attempted to model the damage caused to a piece of CFC due to a lightning strike. However these models have only considered very simple degradation methods and also did not include gas transport. The study presented here is an expansion of what has been discussed previously [4]. A two dimensional numerical model has been built which is designed to predict the damaged caused to a piece of CFC due to a lightning strike. Initial verification of the model is conducted by decoupling the thermal physics from the electrical effects and damaging the pieces of CFC by using laser ablation. The two dimensional numerical model (2D) includes thermal chemical degradation of the polymer via pyrolysis, the resultant gas transport through the decomposing material and carbon fibre vaporisation. An image of the x-ray tomography results of the laser ablated CFC samples are shown in figure 1. The predictions from the 2D model provide a reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Although further expansion of the model, into three dimensions, is required before a true validation of the numerical predictions can be achieved.

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More information

Published date: 18 January 2012
Additional Information: Event Dates: 18-19 January 2012
Venue - Dates: The Fifth UHVnet Colloquium, United Kingdom, 2012-01-18 - 2012-01-19
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 273133
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/273133
PURE UUID: b1fe789d-c70b-4b37-a161-fb285ac6d514

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Date deposited: 20 Jan 2012 17:03
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 06:16

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Contributors

Author: R Chippendale
Author: I O Golosnoy
Author: P L Lewin

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