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5th UHVnet Invited Academic Lecture; Nanodielectrics: Opportunities and Challenges

5th UHVnet Invited Academic Lecture; Nanodielectrics: Opportunities and Challenges
5th UHVnet Invited Academic Lecture; Nanodielectrics: Opportunities and Challenges
The power systems of the future face significant challenges, which are related to the reliable generation and transmission of electrical energy with dramatically reduced environmental impact. While many different strategies will be needed to achieve this, the development of new material systems has a major part to play. Nanocomposites constitute a class of material that seeks to achieve enhanced functionality through the addition of a filler, which is nanoscopic, to an existing matrix system. This approach is attractive in that tried and tested matrix systems are generally chosen and only small amounts of the nanoscopic additive have been claimed to result in substantial improvements in macroscopic behaviour – “Nano-Materials for Mega Benefits!” [1]. However, while the potential of this approach has been adequately demonstrated within the research laboratory, even here, results are not always consistent. For example, it has been claimed that nanodielectrics exhibit improved breakdown performance – but there many examples where the converse is reported. Scientifically, why is this the case? Technologically, how can such materials be used with confidence, particularly over timescales of many decades? This paper will examine, realistically, the current state of the art of nanodielectrics research. It will consider both the promise that exists and the challenges that we face. I would contend that, currently, understanding of the behaviour of nanodielectrics is deficient; we have completed an empirical “exploration phase”, which has highlighted that the topic is worthy of study. What is required now is fundamental understanding. I would also contend that many of the tools we need and the issues that need to be addressed have already been considered in areas such as analytical chemistry, polymer physics and colloid science. The exploitation of the nanodielectric concept can there benefit greatly from adopting a multidisciplinary approach and some of the possible ways forward towards high performance, nanostructured materials will be discussed. [1] ANASTASIA FP7 project, http://www.anastasia-project.eu/
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Vaughan, A S
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3
Vaughan, A S
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3

(2012) 5th UHVnet Invited Academic Lecture; Nanodielectrics: Opportunities and Challenges. The Fifth UHVnet Colloquium, United Kingdom. 18 - 19 Jan 2012. p. 7 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

The power systems of the future face significant challenges, which are related to the reliable generation and transmission of electrical energy with dramatically reduced environmental impact. While many different strategies will be needed to achieve this, the development of new material systems has a major part to play. Nanocomposites constitute a class of material that seeks to achieve enhanced functionality through the addition of a filler, which is nanoscopic, to an existing matrix system. This approach is attractive in that tried and tested matrix systems are generally chosen and only small amounts of the nanoscopic additive have been claimed to result in substantial improvements in macroscopic behaviour – “Nano-Materials for Mega Benefits!” [1]. However, while the potential of this approach has been adequately demonstrated within the research laboratory, even here, results are not always consistent. For example, it has been claimed that nanodielectrics exhibit improved breakdown performance – but there many examples where the converse is reported. Scientifically, why is this the case? Technologically, how can such materials be used with confidence, particularly over timescales of many decades? This paper will examine, realistically, the current state of the art of nanodielectrics research. It will consider both the promise that exists and the challenges that we face. I would contend that, currently, understanding of the behaviour of nanodielectrics is deficient; we have completed an empirical “exploration phase”, which has highlighted that the topic is worthy of study. What is required now is fundamental understanding. I would also contend that many of the tools we need and the issues that need to be addressed have already been considered in areas such as analytical chemistry, polymer physics and colloid science. The exploitation of the nanodielectric concept can there benefit greatly from adopting a multidisciplinary approach and some of the possible ways forward towards high performance, nanostructured materials will be discussed. [1] ANASTASIA FP7 project, http://www.anastasia-project.eu/

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More information

Published date: 18 January 2012
Additional Information: Event Dates: 18-19 January 2012
Venue - Dates: The Fifth UHVnet Colloquium, United Kingdom, 2012-01-18 - 2012-01-19
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 273134
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/273134
PURE UUID: c8aeef45-7c49-49e5-b817-428a44e99755
ORCID for A S Vaughan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0535-513X

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Date deposited: 20 Jan 2012 17:13
Last modified: 09 May 2019 00:36

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Author: A S Vaughan ORCID iD

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