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Mental and physical health co-morbidity in looked after children

Mental and physical health co-morbidity in looked after children
Mental and physical health co-morbidity in looked after children
Children living in public care are more vulnerable to mental and physical health morbidity than their peers living within birth families. The aetiology is complex but pre-care health neglect and abuse, genetic predisposition and the subsequent instability experienced within public care are key contributory factors. Conduct disorder is the commonest mental health problem described. If conduct-related behavioural problems are the defining feature of a child’s difficulties, promoting good physical health becomes particularly challenging. Equally, anxiety and affective disorders can easily be overlooked during physical health consultations. Services must work closely across specialist professional boundaries to promote health in the spirit of the Children Act (1989) as ‘a positive state of mental physical and spiritual wellbeing’. This article describes the evidence for co-morbidity of physical and mental health problems and highlights the importance of close working across mental and physical health services.
co-morbidity, looked after child
1359-1045
315-321
Hill, Catherine M.
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Thompson, Margaret
bfe8522c-b252-4771-8036-744e93357c67
Hill, Catherine M.
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Thompson, Margaret
bfe8522c-b252-4771-8036-744e93357c67

Hill, Catherine M. and Thompson, Margaret (2003) Mental and physical health co-morbidity in looked after children. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 8 (3), 315-321. (doi:10.1177/1359104503008003003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Children living in public care are more vulnerable to mental and physical health morbidity than their peers living within birth families. The aetiology is complex but pre-care health neglect and abuse, genetic predisposition and the subsequent instability experienced within public care are key contributory factors. Conduct disorder is the commonest mental health problem described. If conduct-related behavioural problems are the defining feature of a child’s difficulties, promoting good physical health becomes particularly challenging. Equally, anxiety and affective disorders can easily be overlooked during physical health consultations. Services must work closely across specialist professional boundaries to promote health in the spirit of the Children Act (1989) as ‘a positive state of mental physical and spiritual wellbeing’. This article describes the evidence for co-morbidity of physical and mental health problems and highlights the importance of close working across mental and physical health services.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Keywords: co-morbidity, looked after child

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 27587
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/27587
ISSN: 1359-1045
PURE UUID: 80586353-cc1c-40bc-9d26-11c5f669303c
ORCID for Catherine M. Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2372-5904

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Date deposited: 26 Apr 2006
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 02:59

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Author: Margaret Thompson

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