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Organotypic cultures as tools for functional screening in the CNS

Organotypic cultures as tools for functional screening in the CNS
Organotypic cultures as tools for functional screening in the CNS
Screening gets more complex with organotypic culture systems.
A major challenge for the pharmaceutical industry is the development of relevant model systems in which knowledge gained from high-throughput, genomic and proteomic approaches can be integrated to study function. Animal models are still the main choice for such studies but over the past few years powerful new in vitro systems have begun to emerge as useful tools to study function. Organotypic cultures made from slices of explanted tissue represent a complex multi-cellular in vitro environment with the potential to assess biological function and are uniquely placed to act as an important link between high-throughput approaches and animal models.
tissue culture, neurodegeneration, high content, screening, organotypic
1359-6446
993-1000
Sundstrom, Lars
6d63d054-c735-4fcd-9cfc-2d41d68a06eb
Pringle, Ashley
e8e2a200-6ba8-49ac-a7b8-1a261562eae0
Morrison III, Barclay
3af2e22f-384e-4227-9232-80be2833d667
Bradley, Mark
6339ed95-c491-43a8-b2fb-2384466dc80d
Sundstrom, Lars
6d63d054-c735-4fcd-9cfc-2d41d68a06eb
Pringle, Ashley
e8e2a200-6ba8-49ac-a7b8-1a261562eae0
Morrison III, Barclay
3af2e22f-384e-4227-9232-80be2833d667
Bradley, Mark
6339ed95-c491-43a8-b2fb-2384466dc80d

Sundstrom, Lars, Pringle, Ashley, Morrison III, Barclay and Bradley, Mark (2005) Organotypic cultures as tools for functional screening in the CNS. Drug Discovery Today, 10 (14), 993-1000. (doi:10.1016/S1359-6446(05)03502-6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Screening gets more complex with organotypic culture systems.
A major challenge for the pharmaceutical industry is the development of relevant model systems in which knowledge gained from high-throughput, genomic and proteomic approaches can be integrated to study function. Animal models are still the main choice for such studies but over the past few years powerful new in vitro systems have begun to emerge as useful tools to study function. Organotypic cultures made from slices of explanted tissue represent a complex multi-cellular in vitro environment with the potential to assess biological function and are uniquely placed to act as an important link between high-throughput approaches and animal models.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Additional Information: Review Article
Keywords: tissue culture, neurodegeneration, high content, screening, organotypic

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 27722
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/27722
ISSN: 1359-6446
PURE UUID: f9ce069a-1879-4806-9644-e45a9f4b5504
ORCID for Mark Bradley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2421-4380

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Apr 2006
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:55

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Contributors

Author: Lars Sundstrom
Author: Ashley Pringle
Author: Barclay Morrison III
Author: Mark Bradley ORCID iD

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