The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A hybrid model for the noise generation due to railway wheel flats

A hybrid model for the noise generation due to railway wheel flats
A hybrid model for the noise generation due to railway wheel flats
A numerical model is developed to predict the wheel/rail dynamic interaction occurring due to excitation by wheel flats. A relative displacement excitation is introduced between the wheel and rail that differs from the geometric form of the wheel flat due to the finite curvature of the wheel. To allow for the non-linearity of the contact spring and the possibility of loss of contact between the wheel and the rail, a time-domain model is used to calculate the interaction force. This includes simplified dynamic models of the wheel and the track. In order to predict the consequent noise radiation, the wheel/rail interaction force is transformed into the frequency domain and then converted back to an equivalent roughness spectrum. This spectrum is used as the input to a linear, frequency-domain model of wheel/rail interaction to predict the noise. The noise level due to wheel flat excitation is found to increase with the train speed V at a rate of about 20 log0V whereas rolling noise due to roughness excitation generally increases at about 30 log0V. For all speeds up to at least 200 km/h the noise from typical flats exceeds that due to normal levels of roughness. When the wheel load is doubled the predicted impact noise increases by about 3 dB.
0022-460X
115-139
Wu, T.X.
4f3eef20-3ca9-4910-b05a-4d4f69a919e4
Thompson, D.J.
bca37fd3-d692-4779-b663-5916b01edae5
Wu, T.X.
4f3eef20-3ca9-4910-b05a-4d4f69a919e4
Thompson, D.J.
bca37fd3-d692-4779-b663-5916b01edae5

Wu, T.X. and Thompson, D.J. (2002) A hybrid model for the noise generation due to railway wheel flats. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 251 (1), 115-139. (doi:10.1006/jsvi.2001.3980).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A numerical model is developed to predict the wheel/rail dynamic interaction occurring due to excitation by wheel flats. A relative displacement excitation is introduced between the wheel and rail that differs from the geometric form of the wheel flat due to the finite curvature of the wheel. To allow for the non-linearity of the contact spring and the possibility of loss of contact between the wheel and the rail, a time-domain model is used to calculate the interaction force. This includes simplified dynamic models of the wheel and the track. In order to predict the consequent noise radiation, the wheel/rail interaction force is transformed into the frequency domain and then converted back to an equivalent roughness spectrum. This spectrum is used as the input to a linear, frequency-domain model of wheel/rail interaction to predict the noise. The noise level due to wheel flat excitation is found to increase with the train speed V at a rate of about 20 log0V whereas rolling noise due to roughness excitation generally increases at about 30 log0V. For all speeds up to at least 200 km/h the noise from typical flats exceeds that due to normal levels of roughness. When the wheel load is doubled the predicted impact noise increases by about 3 dB.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2002

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 28035
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/28035
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: 1ef08cc6-9d91-4962-bbd3-5dc72804181f
ORCID for D.J. Thompson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7964-5906

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Apr 2006
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:59

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×