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Hearing threshold levels and speech recognition in noise in 7-year-olds

Hearing threshold levels and speech recognition in noise in 7-year-olds
Hearing threshold levels and speech recognition in noise in 7-year-olds
International standards define normal hearing threshold levels (HTLs) and many studies describe speech recognition in noise (SRN) for adults. Less has been published on these characteristics for children. This study aims to establish ranges of HTLs and SRN for otologically normal 7-year-olds. Air conduction HTLs were measured in 189 7-year-olds within an audiometric booth. Speech recognition was measured adaptively for BKB sentences in noise presented binaurally through headphones, determining the speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to score 71% correct. The mean HTLs of otologically normal 7-year-olds were significantly lower (better) than those published for young adults at 1 and 2 kHz. Speech recognition in noise was unrelated to HTLs and was higher (worse) for 7-year-olds (SNR?=???4 dB) than has been found for young otologically normal adults (SNR?=???6 dB). It is concluded that although the HTLs of 7-year-old children are generally better than those of young adults, their speech recognition in noise is worse. This confirms that their ability to recognise speech in noise is not fully developed at this age.
children, hearing threshold levels, speech recognition in noise, bkb sentences
435-443
Blandy, Susan E
483407b0-3c92-430a-9db4-33f5343b57f4
Lutman, Mark E.
9a07e2b0-16a7-498d-9d35-0a86ba8b8a8b
Blandy, Susan E
483407b0-3c92-430a-9db4-33f5343b57f4
Lutman, Mark E.
9a07e2b0-16a7-498d-9d35-0a86ba8b8a8b

Blandy, Susan E and Lutman, Mark E. (2005) Hearing threshold levels and speech recognition in noise in 7-year-olds. International Journal of Audiology, 44 (8), 435-443. (doi:10.1080/14992020500189203).

Record type: Article

Abstract

International standards define normal hearing threshold levels (HTLs) and many studies describe speech recognition in noise (SRN) for adults. Less has been published on these characteristics for children. This study aims to establish ranges of HTLs and SRN for otologically normal 7-year-olds. Air conduction HTLs were measured in 189 7-year-olds within an audiometric booth. Speech recognition was measured adaptively for BKB sentences in noise presented binaurally through headphones, determining the speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to score 71% correct. The mean HTLs of otologically normal 7-year-olds were significantly lower (better) than those published for young adults at 1 and 2 kHz. Speech recognition in noise was unrelated to HTLs and was higher (worse) for 7-year-olds (SNR?=???4 dB) than has been found for young otologically normal adults (SNR?=???6 dB). It is concluded that although the HTLs of 7-year-old children are generally better than those of young adults, their speech recognition in noise is worse. This confirms that their ability to recognise speech in noise is not fully developed at this age.

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More information

Published date: August 2005
Keywords: children, hearing threshold levels, speech recognition in noise, bkb sentences
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 28284
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/28284
PURE UUID: c4d07615-3408-4234-bea9-4bbab0bf503b

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Date deposited: 28 Apr 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:11

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