The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Sound-field analysis by plane-wave decomposition using spherical microphone array

Sound-field analysis by plane-wave decomposition using spherical microphone array
Sound-field analysis by plane-wave decomposition using spherical microphone array
Directional sound-field information is becoming more important in sound-field analysis and auditorium acoustics, and, as a consequence, a variety of microphone arrays have recently been studied that provide such information. In particular, spherical microphone arrays have been proposed that provide three-dimensional information by decomposing the sound field into spherical harmonics. The theoretical formulation of the plane-wave decomposition and array performance analysis were also presented. In this paper, as a direct continuation of the recent work, a spherical microphone array configured around a rigid sphere is designed, analyzed using simulation, and then used experimentally to decompose the sound field in an anechoic chamber and an auditorium into waves. The array employs a maximum of 98 measurement positions around the sphere, and is used to compute spherical harmonics up to order 6. In the current paper we investigate the factors affecting the performance of plane-wave decomposition, showing that the direct sound and several reflections in an auditorium can be identified experimentally. This suggests that the microphone arrays studied here can be employed in various acoustic applications to identify the characteristics of reverberant sound fields.
0001-4966
3094-3103
Park, M.
78896413-21cb-484d-ac1c-fb366330acc6
Rafaely, B.
9ebbb11a-73e0-4c6f-95c9-b146d01e5b50
Park, M.
78896413-21cb-484d-ac1c-fb366330acc6
Rafaely, B.
9ebbb11a-73e0-4c6f-95c9-b146d01e5b50

Park, M. and Rafaely, B. (2005) Sound-field analysis by plane-wave decomposition using spherical microphone array. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 118 (5), 3094-3103. (doi:10.1121/1.2063108).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Directional sound-field information is becoming more important in sound-field analysis and auditorium acoustics, and, as a consequence, a variety of microphone arrays have recently been studied that provide such information. In particular, spherical microphone arrays have been proposed that provide three-dimensional information by decomposing the sound field into spherical harmonics. The theoretical formulation of the plane-wave decomposition and array performance analysis were also presented. In this paper, as a direct continuation of the recent work, a spherical microphone array configured around a rigid sphere is designed, analyzed using simulation, and then used experimentally to decompose the sound field in an anechoic chamber and an auditorium into waves. The array employs a maximum of 98 measurement positions around the sphere, and is used to compute spherical harmonics up to order 6. In the current paper we investigate the factors affecting the performance of plane-wave decomposition, showing that the direct sound and several reflections in an auditorium can be identified experimentally. This suggests that the microphone arrays studied here can be employed in various acoustic applications to identify the characteristics of reverberant sound fields.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 28338
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/28338
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: f9da2fc4-a569-43d4-b6b4-8744ced6287a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 May 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:01

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×