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Response surface method optimization of uniform and axially segmented duct acoustic liners

Response surface method optimization of uniform and axially segmented duct acoustic liners
Response surface method optimization of uniform and axially segmented duct acoustic liners
An extensive duct acoustics propagation study is presented that has been conducted to assess the design of a liner for an aeroengine inlet duct. The aim is to predict how different liner configuarations, at various flight conditions affect the attenuation of sound in an inlet. Two different noise source models are used: single mode and multimode. These represent the two principal fan noise sources: tonal and broadband noise. The two noise source models are then combined to predict the overall attenuation. An optimization procedure based on a response surface model is presented, to investigate a uniform and an axially segmented acoustic liner. The objective function used in the optimization is based on an approximate calculation of the perceived noise level. The aim is to utilize and axially segmented liner to increase, compared to a unifrom liner, the overall sound attenuation that is predicted. The main feature that emerges is that it is possible to increase the attenuation with an axially segmented liner only when a limited number of propagating modes are present.
0021-8669
1089-1102
Lafronza, L.
d8c1b33f-8e61-4364-a496-d1f4abd0862c
McAlpine, A.
aaf9e771-153d-4100-9e84-de4b14466ed7
Keane, A.J.
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Astley, R.J.
cb7fed9f-a96a-4b58-8939-6db1010f9893
Lafronza, L.
d8c1b33f-8e61-4364-a496-d1f4abd0862c
McAlpine, A.
aaf9e771-153d-4100-9e84-de4b14466ed7
Keane, A.J.
26d7fa33-5415-4910-89d8-fb3620413def
Astley, R.J.
cb7fed9f-a96a-4b58-8939-6db1010f9893

Lafronza, L., McAlpine, A., Keane, A.J. and Astley, R.J. (2006) Response surface method optimization of uniform and axially segmented duct acoustic liners. Journal of Aircraft, 43 (4), 1089-1102.

Record type: Article

Abstract

An extensive duct acoustics propagation study is presented that has been conducted to assess the design of a liner for an aeroengine inlet duct. The aim is to predict how different liner configuarations, at various flight conditions affect the attenuation of sound in an inlet. Two different noise source models are used: single mode and multimode. These represent the two principal fan noise sources: tonal and broadband noise. The two noise source models are then combined to predict the overall attenuation. An optimization procedure based on a response surface model is presented, to investigate a uniform and an axially segmented acoustic liner. The objective function used in the optimization is based on an approximate calculation of the perceived noise level. The aim is to utilize and axially segmented liner to increase, compared to a unifrom liner, the overall sound attenuation that is predicted. The main feature that emerges is that it is possible to increase the attenuation with an axially segmented liner only when a limited number of propagating modes are present.

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Published date: 2006
Additional Information: Accepted for publication

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 28407
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/28407
ISSN: 0021-8669
PURE UUID: 4ea04e8f-a030-4b17-8f20-ff810f03dbf5
ORCID for A. McAlpine: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4189-2167

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Date deposited: 03 May 2006
Last modified: 07 Aug 2019 00:48

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