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The auditory middle latency response, evoked using maximum length sequences and chirps, as an indicator of adequacy of anesthesia

The auditory middle latency response, evoked using maximum length sequences and chirps, as an indicator of adequacy of anesthesia
The auditory middle latency response, evoked using maximum length sequences and chirps, as an indicator of adequacy of anesthesia
The auditory evoked potential known as the middle latency response (MLR), evoked with regular click stimulation at around 5 Hz, has been suggested as an indicator of adequacy of anesthesia. The MLR is a very small signal embedded in high levels of background noise, so it can take a long time to acquire. However, using a stimulus paradigm of chirps presented in a maximum length sequence, the acquisition of the MLR can be improved compared to using conventional click stimulation. In this pilot study, we investigated this new technique in a clinical environment. Significant changes in MLR amplitude, but not latency, were measured for six of seven subjects in association with changes in responsiveness to command using the isolated forearm technique. The absence of any latency shift differs from other studies of the MLR during anesthesia and highlights the limited understanding of the relationship between anesthesia and the MLR.
0003-2999
495-498
Bell, Steven L.
91de0801-d2b7-44ba-8e8e-523e672aed8a
Smith, David C.
cc2ef49e-7c4a-4476-9ed0-18ec22976bf1
Allen, Robert
956a918f-278c-48ef-8e19-65aa463f199a
Lutman, Mark E.
add34340-3241-4346-a668-8f51fdea6692
Bell, Steven L.
91de0801-d2b7-44ba-8e8e-523e672aed8a
Smith, David C.
cc2ef49e-7c4a-4476-9ed0-18ec22976bf1
Allen, Robert
956a918f-278c-48ef-8e19-65aa463f199a
Lutman, Mark E.
add34340-3241-4346-a668-8f51fdea6692

Bell, Steven L., Smith, David C., Allen, Robert and Lutman, Mark E. (2006) The auditory middle latency response, evoked using maximum length sequences and chirps, as an indicator of adequacy of anesthesia. Anesthesia and analgesia, 102 (2), 495-498. (doi:10.1213/01.ane.0000189191.71449.48).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The auditory evoked potential known as the middle latency response (MLR), evoked with regular click stimulation at around 5 Hz, has been suggested as an indicator of adequacy of anesthesia. The MLR is a very small signal embedded in high levels of background noise, so it can take a long time to acquire. However, using a stimulus paradigm of chirps presented in a maximum length sequence, the acquisition of the MLR can be improved compared to using conventional click stimulation. In this pilot study, we investigated this new technique in a clinical environment. Significant changes in MLR amplitude, but not latency, were measured for six of seven subjects in association with changes in responsiveness to command using the isolated forearm technique. The absence of any latency shift differs from other studies of the MLR during anesthesia and highlights the limited understanding of the relationship between anesthesia and the MLR.

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Published date: February 2006
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 28409
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/28409
ISSN: 0003-2999
PURE UUID: 19b3ab18-fb3d-4e36-988c-7c71f8957ee7

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Date deposited: 28 Apr 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 16:01

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