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Active vibration control using an inertial actuator with internal damping

Active vibration control using an inertial actuator with internal damping
Active vibration control using an inertial actuator with internal damping
Collocated direct velocity feedback with ideal point force actuators mounted on structures is unconditionally stable and generates active damping. When inertial actuators are used to generate the control force, the system can become unstable even for moderate velocity feedback gains due to an additional –180° phase lag introduced by the fundamental axial resonant mode of the inertial actuator. In this study a relative velocity sensor is used to implement an inner velocity feedback loop that generates internal damping in a lightweight, electrodynamic, inertial actuator. Simulation results for a model problem with the actuator mounted on a clamped plate show that, when internal relative velocity feedback is used in addition to a conventional external velocity feedback loop, there is an optimum combination of internal and external velocity feedback gains, which, for a given gain margin, maximizes vibration reduction. These predictions are validated in experiments with a specially built lightweight inertial actuator.
2131-2140
Paulitsch, Christoph
7ac64382-416f-437c-b17c-e39aa07c96b8
Gardonio, Paolo
bae5bf72-ea81-43a6-a756-d7153d2de77a
Elliott, Stephen J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567
Paulitsch, Christoph
7ac64382-416f-437c-b17c-e39aa07c96b8
Gardonio, Paolo
bae5bf72-ea81-43a6-a756-d7153d2de77a
Elliott, Stephen J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567

Paulitsch, Christoph, Gardonio, Paolo and Elliott, Stephen J. (2006) Active vibration control using an inertial actuator with internal damping. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 119 (4), 2131-2140. (doi:10.1121/1.2141228).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Collocated direct velocity feedback with ideal point force actuators mounted on structures is unconditionally stable and generates active damping. When inertial actuators are used to generate the control force, the system can become unstable even for moderate velocity feedback gains due to an additional –180° phase lag introduced by the fundamental axial resonant mode of the inertial actuator. In this study a relative velocity sensor is used to implement an inner velocity feedback loop that generates internal damping in a lightweight, electrodynamic, inertial actuator. Simulation results for a model problem with the actuator mounted on a clamped plate show that, when internal relative velocity feedback is used in addition to a conventional external velocity feedback loop, there is an optimum combination of internal and external velocity feedback gains, which, for a given gain margin, maximizes vibration reduction. These predictions are validated in experiments with a specially built lightweight inertial actuator.

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More information

Published date: 2006
Organisations: Signal Processing & Control Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 28567
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/28567
PURE UUID: 04a510a7-1fb6-4a4f-992a-d7d95df855ef

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Apr 2006
Last modified: 05 Oct 2018 12:04

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Contributors

Author: Christoph Paulitsch
Author: Paolo Gardonio

University divisions

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