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Development of a cerebral autoregulation model for use with clinical blood flow measurements.

Development of a cerebral autoregulation model for use with clinical blood flow measurements.
Development of a cerebral autoregulation model for use with clinical blood flow measurements.
Cerebral autoregulation is the mechanism which controls blood flow to the brain despite variations in blood pressure. Although important this mechanism is currently not well understood, with autoregulatory failure difficult to diagnose. In this paper we develop a simple model based upon those measurements available in the clinical setting. The model can replicate previous results and is used to investigate a variety of hypothetical autoregulatory responses. Furthermore the model has been extended by including the autoregulatory vessels themselves to explain the observed influence of increased carbon dioxide levels in the blood. A focus on only those measurements which may be realistically obtained in human patients avoids the need for estimating many unknown parameters or the modelling of complex and poorly understood physiological process necessary in previous, more complicated, models.
1387-3954
367-386
Schley, D.
3d807658-2cfd-40e6-90ba-5032f88bb54b
Craine, R.E.
6891a4b5-7b12-4019-8222-8a8448803890
Birch, A.A.
6998ba08-f9c9-44bd-a666-08090c8e18dd
Schley, D.
3d807658-2cfd-40e6-90ba-5032f88bb54b
Craine, R.E.
6891a4b5-7b12-4019-8222-8a8448803890
Birch, A.A.
6998ba08-f9c9-44bd-a666-08090c8e18dd

Schley, D., Craine, R.E. and Birch, A.A. (2003) Development of a cerebral autoregulation model for use with clinical blood flow measurements. Mathematical and Computer Modelling of Dynamical Systems, 9 (4), 367-386. (doi:10.1076/mcmd.9.4.367.27901).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cerebral autoregulation is the mechanism which controls blood flow to the brain despite variations in blood pressure. Although important this mechanism is currently not well understood, with autoregulatory failure difficult to diagnose. In this paper we develop a simple model based upon those measurements available in the clinical setting. The model can replicate previous results and is used to investigate a variety of hypothetical autoregulatory responses. Furthermore the model has been extended by including the autoregulatory vessels themselves to explain the observed influence of increased carbon dioxide levels in the blood. A focus on only those measurements which may be realistically obtained in human patients avoids the need for estimating many unknown parameters or the modelling of complex and poorly understood physiological process necessary in previous, more complicated, models.

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Published date: 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 29290
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/29290
ISSN: 1387-3954
PURE UUID: 1044b968-f1e0-4d2f-a14e-1326f4264f4a

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Date deposited: 12 May 2006
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 18:56

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Contributors

Author: D. Schley
Author: R.E. Craine
Author: A.A. Birch

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