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Three-dimensional relativistic simulations of rotating neutron star collapse to a Kerr black hole

Three-dimensional relativistic simulations of rotating neutron star collapse to a Kerr black hole
Three-dimensional relativistic simulations of rotating neutron star collapse to a Kerr black hole
We present a new three-dimensional fully general-relativistic hydrodynamics code using high-resolution shock-capturing techniques and a conformal traceless formulation of the Einstein equations. Besides presenting a thorough set of tests which the code passes with very high accuracy, we discuss its application to the study of the gravitational collapse of uniformly rotating neutron stars to Kerr black holes. The initial stellar models are modeled as relativistic polytropes which are either secularly or dynamically unstable and with angular velocities which range from slow rotation to the mass-shedding limit. We investigate the gravitational collapse by carefully studying not only the dynamics of the matter, but also that of the trapped surfaces, i.e., of both the apparent and event horizons formed during the collapse. The use of these surfaces, together with the dynamical horizon framework, allows for a precise measurement of the black-hole mass and spin. The ability to successfully perform these simulations for sufficiently long times relies on excising a region of the computational domain which includes the singularity and is within the apparent horizon. The dynamics of the collapsing matter is strongly influenced by the initial amount of angular momentum in the progenitor star and, for initial models with sufficiently high angular velocities, the collapse can lead to the formation of an unstable disc in differential rotation. All of the simulations performed with uniformly rotating initial data and a polytropic or ideal-fluid equation of state show no evidence of shocks or of the presence of matter on stable orbits outside the black hole.
1550-7998
024035-[30pp]
Baiotti, Luca
dbd19d31-e879-4707-bf60-2d230ab66d81
Hawke, Ian
fc964672-c794-4260-a972-eaf818e7c9f4
Montero, Pedro J.
2383a6af-8270-4b06-b896-febe30fbf3f6
Löffler, Frank
a0a360fc-228b-4f6c-9dd0-f67307c39396
Rezzolla, Luciano
179e9831-5ba7-4d93-9728-2b27092b1f40
Stergioulas, Nikolaos
7ff499f3-91e1-497f-bee6-4d8b5ca581da
Font, José A.
c0f44781-eab1-46be-8cc0-f326ab651a94
Seidel, Ed
ee4691ee-8196-4f47-914c-320a64216308
Baiotti, Luca
dbd19d31-e879-4707-bf60-2d230ab66d81
Hawke, Ian
fc964672-c794-4260-a972-eaf818e7c9f4
Montero, Pedro J.
2383a6af-8270-4b06-b896-febe30fbf3f6
Löffler, Frank
a0a360fc-228b-4f6c-9dd0-f67307c39396
Rezzolla, Luciano
179e9831-5ba7-4d93-9728-2b27092b1f40
Stergioulas, Nikolaos
7ff499f3-91e1-497f-bee6-4d8b5ca581da
Font, José A.
c0f44781-eab1-46be-8cc0-f326ab651a94
Seidel, Ed
ee4691ee-8196-4f47-914c-320a64216308

Baiotti, Luca, Hawke, Ian, Montero, Pedro J., Löffler, Frank, Rezzolla, Luciano, Stergioulas, Nikolaos, Font, José A. and Seidel, Ed (2005) Three-dimensional relativistic simulations of rotating neutron star collapse to a Kerr black hole. Physical Review D, 71 (2), 024035-[30pp]. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.71.024035).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We present a new three-dimensional fully general-relativistic hydrodynamics code using high-resolution shock-capturing techniques and a conformal traceless formulation of the Einstein equations. Besides presenting a thorough set of tests which the code passes with very high accuracy, we discuss its application to the study of the gravitational collapse of uniformly rotating neutron stars to Kerr black holes. The initial stellar models are modeled as relativistic polytropes which are either secularly or dynamically unstable and with angular velocities which range from slow rotation to the mass-shedding limit. We investigate the gravitational collapse by carefully studying not only the dynamics of the matter, but also that of the trapped surfaces, i.e., of both the apparent and event horizons formed during the collapse. The use of these surfaces, together with the dynamical horizon framework, allows for a precise measurement of the black-hole mass and spin. The ability to successfully perform these simulations for sufficiently long times relies on excising a region of the computational domain which includes the singularity and is within the apparent horizon. The dynamics of the collapsing matter is strongly influenced by the initial amount of angular momentum in the progenitor star and, for initial models with sufficiently high angular velocities, the collapse can lead to the formation of an unstable disc in differential rotation. All of the simulations performed with uniformly rotating initial data and a polytropic or ideal-fluid equation of state show no evidence of shocks or of the presence of matter on stable orbits outside the black hole.

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Published date: 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 29318
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/29318
ISSN: 1550-7998
PURE UUID: 76818f8a-0854-4cff-8c6f-e9969f9b1044
ORCID for Ian Hawke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4805-0309

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Date deposited: 11 May 2006
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:46

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Contributors

Author: Luca Baiotti
Author: Ian Hawke ORCID iD
Author: Pedro J. Montero
Author: Frank Löffler
Author: Luciano Rezzolla
Author: Nikolaos Stergioulas
Author: José A. Font
Author: Ed Seidel

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