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System dynamics modeling of chlamydia infection for screening intervention planning and cost-benefit estimation

System dynamics modeling of chlamydia infection for screening intervention planning and cost-benefit estimation
System dynamics modeling of chlamydia infection for screening intervention planning and cost-benefit estimation
Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the UK. It constitutes a major public health problem given that the majority of infections are asymptomatic which can lead to serious long-term medical consequences if not treated. This paper describes a System Dynamics model for capturing Chlamydia infection dynamics within a population, incorporating the behaviour of different risk groups, and provides a cost-benefit study for screening using data collected from the Department of Health opportunistic Chlamydia screening programme in Portsmouth. Furthermore, we demonstrate that high-risk groups are key in determining the overall infection dynamics of the system, and quantify screening rates required to manage infection prevalence within the wider population.
system dynamics, infection modelling, cost-benefit study
1471-678X
265-279
Evenden, Dave
5cd6f0ab-5269-447c-af32-01edac9c905d
Harper, Paul R.
57b143a6-7f33-4310-9996-90301ffbcb41
Brailsford, Sally C.
634585ff-c828-46ca-b33d-7ac017dda04f
Harindra, Veerakathy
4f8eae62-c304-4db8-bb9d-809e0df1c463
Evenden, Dave
5cd6f0ab-5269-447c-af32-01edac9c905d
Harper, Paul R.
57b143a6-7f33-4310-9996-90301ffbcb41
Brailsford, Sally C.
634585ff-c828-46ca-b33d-7ac017dda04f
Harindra, Veerakathy
4f8eae62-c304-4db8-bb9d-809e0df1c463

Evenden, Dave, Harper, Paul R., Brailsford, Sally C. and Harindra, Veerakathy (2005) System dynamics modeling of chlamydia infection for screening intervention planning and cost-benefit estimation. IMA Journal of Management Mathematics, 16 (3), 265-279. (doi:10.1093/imaman/dpi022).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the UK. It constitutes a major public health problem given that the majority of infections are asymptomatic which can lead to serious long-term medical consequences if not treated. This paper describes a System Dynamics model for capturing Chlamydia infection dynamics within a population, incorporating the behaviour of different risk groups, and provides a cost-benefit study for screening using data collected from the Department of Health opportunistic Chlamydia screening programme in Portsmouth. Furthermore, we demonstrate that high-risk groups are key in determining the overall infection dynamics of the system, and quantify screening rates required to manage infection prevalence within the wider population.

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Published date: 1 July 2005
Keywords: system dynamics, infection modelling, cost-benefit study
Organisations: Operational Research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 29710
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/29710
ISSN: 1471-678X
PURE UUID: df417a14-5e70-4295-a755-e57a5c08e9f1
ORCID for Dave Evenden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6798-648X
ORCID for Sally C. Brailsford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6665-8230

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 May 2006
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 03:26

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Contributors

Author: Dave Evenden ORCID iD
Author: Paul R. Harper
Author: Veerakathy Harindra

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