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Editorial: failure to rescue: improving nursing care for older people

Editorial: failure to rescue: improving nursing care for older people
Editorial: failure to rescue: improving nursing care for older people
Failure to rescue is an area of research and service improvement that reflects the need for a broader focus on the quality of care for older patients. Using this as a quality indicator focuses attention on clinical work that must be done to rescue these patients. Dignity, compassion and the relational and emotional aspects of care are vitally important, but these are not the reasons people attend hospitals. Just as patients in the review of Bridges et al. (2010) may have taken the quality of clinical care for granted perhaps we too run the danger of doing so when we focus on how to measure dignity, but not on the quality and outcome of clinical care. We have looked for compassion but missed nursing interventions that might save lives.

Many older people may be reaching a stage where palliation is a goal and death is anticipated. However, this is not the case for all, and it certainly does not offer an excuse for a failure to identify and decide on the appropriate intervention when complications occur. In a seamless approach, each aspect of care supports and enhances the other, such that successful relational practice helps nurses assess risk, to deal with the impact of illness for individuals and to recognise and respond to treatment needs while supporting patients and families to make decisions that reflect their wishes and best interests. If nursing teams are not adequately resourced and nurses not properly focussed on physical and emotional care, older patients’ clinical outcomes will continue to be suboptimal. Dignity and compassion are vital, and nursing care without them is shocking, but a failure to rescue the older people in our care may be an even bigger scandal.
1748-3735
1-2
Bridges, Jackie
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Griffiths, Peter
ac7afec1-7d72-4b83-b016-3a43e245265b
Pope, Catherine
21ae1290-0838-4245-adcf-6f901a0d4607
Bartlett, Ruth
b059d54d-9431-43a8-9d1d-19d35ab57ac3
Bridges, Jackie
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Griffiths, Peter
ac7afec1-7d72-4b83-b016-3a43e245265b
Pope, Catherine
21ae1290-0838-4245-adcf-6f901a0d4607
Bartlett, Ruth
b059d54d-9431-43a8-9d1d-19d35ab57ac3

Bridges, Jackie, Griffiths, Peter, Pope, Catherine and Bartlett, Ruth (2012) Editorial: failure to rescue: improving nursing care for older people International Journal of Older People Nursing, 7, (1), pp. 1-2.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Failure to rescue is an area of research and service improvement that reflects the need for a broader focus on the quality of care for older patients. Using this as a quality indicator focuses attention on clinical work that must be done to rescue these patients. Dignity, compassion and the relational and emotional aspects of care are vitally important, but these are not the reasons people attend hospitals. Just as patients in the review of Bridges et al. (2010) may have taken the quality of clinical care for granted perhaps we too run the danger of doing so when we focus on how to measure dignity, but not on the quality and outcome of clinical care. We have looked for compassion but missed nursing interventions that might save lives.

Many older people may be reaching a stage where palliation is a goal and death is anticipated. However, this is not the case for all, and it certainly does not offer an excuse for a failure to identify and decide on the appropriate intervention when complications occur. In a seamless approach, each aspect of care supports and enhances the other, such that successful relational practice helps nurses assess risk, to deal with the impact of illness for individuals and to recognise and respond to treatment needs while supporting patients and families to make decisions that reflect their wishes and best interests. If nursing teams are not adequately resourced and nurses not properly focussed on physical and emotional care, older patients’ clinical outcomes will continue to be suboptimal. Dignity and compassion are vital, and nursing care without them is shocking, but a failure to rescue the older people in our care may be an even bigger scandal.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 20 February 2012
Published date: 1 March 2012
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 300360
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/300360
ISSN: 1748-3735
PURE UUID: b38b5e8c-d0eb-43c4-8648-99235be2982b
ORCID for Jackie Bridges: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6776-736X
ORCID for Peter Griffiths: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2439-2857
ORCID for Catherine Pope: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8935-6702
ORCID for Ruth Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3412-2300

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Feb 2012 11:22
Last modified: 09 Oct 2017 07:06

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Contributors

Author: Jackie Bridges ORCID iD
Author: Peter Griffiths ORCID iD
Author: Catherine Pope ORCID iD
Author: Ruth Bartlett ORCID iD

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